Oregon Fishing Reports for Sept 14

Willamette Valley/Metro – With the emergency closure at the end of the day on Wednesday (September 12th), anglers got their last licks in on Chinook, which are in peak migration in the middle river right now. Action had been sporadic by section but the lower deadline near the mouth of the Kalama River and the Bonneville reach have been fishing the best. Pro trolls with 3.5 spinners or red label herring had been the ticket, but anglers willing to target fish closer to incoming tide have proven to be the most successful. Anchor anglers have not had an overwhelming season. Adult and jack Chinook numbers are tracking ahead of last year’s run, but managers were forced to close the fishery prematurely due to the poor overall returns crossing at Bonneville. The closure may go through the end of the year, but may change if Bonneville counts improve dramatically and immediately.

The mainstem upstream of Bonneville Dam will also close until further notice and ODF&W had re-opened the mouth of the Deschutes River for Chinook and coho, but this section is now also closed with the emergency regulation. All steelhead incidentally caught on the mainstem Columbia must be released with extreme care. Coho counts are higher than what they were at this time last year.

Anglers are starting to fish in earnest on the lower Clackamas, in hopes of early season coho, which should be present and growing in numbers. Small clusters of drifted eggs or casting spinners should produce results for persistent anglers.

Pro guide Jeff Stoeger of O2BFISHN (503-704-7920) reports, coho should start showing on the Sandy River as well and with cloudy weather and some precipitation in the forecast, action should be fair for weekend anglers. These fish can be finicky however.

Recreational anglers will be able to retain sturgeon from the Wauna Powerlines (about 40 miles upstream of the mouth) to the deadlines at Bonneville Dam this Saturday. This will be the first of a 2-day season, the other open day being September 22nd for fish between 44 and 50 inches. Anglers are advised of an obscure rule requiring measurement to be taken on the underside of the sturgeon as a discrepancy in length can happen when measured over the top of the fish. The lower Willamette River remains closed to sturgeon retention.

Northwest Oregon – The Chinook fishery on the north coast is heating up, but as is common for the early season, results are sporadic. Chinook are being caught both inside and outside of Tillamook Bay.

The “any salmon” season last Friday and Saturday was good with ideal ocean conditions. Fair numbers of coho were being caught with some coho eclipsing 15 pounds in weight. Ocean weather looks favorable for good fishing on the next Friday and Saturday opener (September 14 & 15). A transfer for several thousand more coho from the leftover quota in the south of Falcon fishery will extend it at least through this weekend.

Nearshore halibut and rockfishing remains open as well and crabbing is picking up with the males starting to fill out better after the July molt.

Other north coast systems have yet to take off but the Nehalem, Salmon and Nestucca systems should improve this week. These systems have not taken off in any consistent manner just yet.

The Alsea especially, and the Siletz should start seeing better catches this week. The Siletz season will likely improve later this month. Tides are good for lower bay and lower tidewater action.

Astoria area – Coho fishing in the estuary has been extremely spotty. Last year, the middle of September produced white-hot hatchery coho catches, but the season overall for coho has been challenging. It’ll be closed this weekend, anglers will need to hedge their bets on a calm ocean and a “any two salmon” limit out of ports south of Cape Falcon (Manzanita) this weekend.

Crabbing is improving here, and the soft tide series this weekend should prove productive.

Central and Eastern Oregon –From our Friend Tim Moran.

Deschutes River – Reports from the shops are the same. There are fish – Steelhead in the river but no one is fishing for them. The guides are getting customers on 2 to 4 per day.

Metolius River – The Met is great! The Green Drake hatch is still happening and it has been very good from 2 pm until dark. PMD’s and caddis will be in the mix too. Small olive and golden stones are out as well. Did I mention Bull Trout?

John Day River – I love fall on the JDR. the water is still warm and it’s very low which means fish stack up in the deeper holes and runs.

Crooked River – Flows are low and stable and when that happens fishing is always good! Small nymphs under a small indicator or on a dry/ dropper always produce here.

Owyhee River – September is the best month on the Owyhee! The hatches are great and the fish instinctively know that winter is coming and it’s time to fatten up!

Southwest – From ODF&W

From ODF&W

The rockfish bite is back on. Anglers were catching limits or near-limits of rockfish over the weekend. However, lingcod catches remain spotty during the month of September. Reminder that through Sept. 30, the general marine bottomfish fishery is restricted to inside of the 30-fathom regulatory line.

The longleader gear fishery outside of the 40-fathom regulatory line continues through September. Catches from offshore longleader trips often consist of a nice grade of yellowtail, widow and canary rockfishes. Reminder that the Stonewall Bank Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation Area is closed to all bottomfish trips, including longleader trips.

The Stonewall Bank Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation area, approximately 15 miles west of Newport, is closed to bottomfish (groundfish) and halibut fishing year round.

From Humbug Mountain to the OR/CA border, salmon fishing closed on Aug. 26. The Chetco River Fall Chinook State Waters Terminal Fishery will open on Oct. 6-7 and Oct. 13-14 with a daily bag limit of 1 Chinook per angler.

For the southern Oregon Subarea, halibut is open 7 days a week through Oct. 31 or attaining the quota of 8,982 lbs. As of Aug. 30 there is 61 percent of the quota remaining.

Anglers had limited success on albacore tuna during this past week. Access to albacore was most limited by weather conditions and most fish were found well offshore (40 miles or more).

On the lower Rogue, water levels continue to drop as we enter the driest part of the year. With cooler than average water temperatures, Chinook have begun to move up river.

Those interested in getting out of the wind or fog may want to head up river to fish for half-pounders and adult summer steelhead. Both have been moving up river in descent numbers.

September is a good time to fish fall Chinook in the middle Rogue area.

Anglers are catching summer steelhead on plugs fished from a drift boat, or side planner and plug from shore, or drifting night crawlers or roe/yarn imitations.

The Rogue River is also open for trout fishing. Only hatchery rainbow trout may be retained. All wild rainbow and cutthroat trout must be released.

With the start of September, the artificial fly season is underway between Fishers Ferry boat ramp and Cole Rivers Hatchery. Between Sept. 1 and Oct. 31, anglers may only fish artificial flies on any type rod and reel: no added weights or attachments except a bubble.

As of Sept. 5, 1,419 Summer Steelhead had entered Cole Rivers Hatchery, with 42 new for the week.

Fishing for bass and other warmwater species should be good at Willow Lake.

Where water levels are too low for boats, like at Hyatt, Emigrant, Fish and Agate, bank anglers will continue to find terrific fall fishing.

Fishing continues to be good at Diamond Lake. Most anglers are taking home fish averaging 15-inches and we are starting to see more 17-inch or larger fish in creel surveys.

Anglers are continuing to catch largemouth bass, crappie and bluegills from the fishing dock and along the weedlines in Eel Lake.

Fishing for bluegills on Lower Empire Lake has been good but most of the fish are small.

Large rainbow trout will be stocked at Fish Lake by the end of this week, a bit early than scheduled because water levels at Fish Lake are dropping fast. The USFS boat ramp is no longer available, and only very small boats can launch at the resort ramp. Even this rock ramp will be dewatered soon.

Anglers fishing from shore, or from inflatables or personal watercraft should have very good fishing at Fish Lake this fall. Water clarity is poor due to a bloom at this time, however.

Galesville has been stocked several times this year and should have lots of trout from previous stockings. In addition to trout, the reservoir was stocked with coho smolts until 2015.

In Galesville Reservoir, all landlocked salmon are considered trout and are part of the five-per-day trout limit, with only one trout over 20-inches long allowed for harvest.

Fishing for bass and other panfish should be decent. Good areas are near dead snags and the boat ramp.

Trout fishing continues to be good at Garrison Lake.

Trout fishing on Tenmile Lakes has slowed down with the best fishing is in the early mornings.

Fishing for largemouth bass has been good with the best fishing in the early mornings or late evenings.

The annual closure of the South Umpqua and Cow Creek will begin Sept. 15 and continue through Nov. 30. The South Umpqua and Cow Creek are open until then for catch-and-release trout fishing.

Bass fishing is good throughout the South Umpqua with particularly high catch rates from Canyonville to the mouth at River Forks/Singleton parks.

Chinook fishing closed on July 1. Summer steelhead fishing has been slow throughout the North Umpqua, it should pick back up again with cooler weather in the forecast.

Please be aware that through Sept. 30, 2018 all fishing is closed within a radius of 200 feet from the mouths of all tributaries (including 200 feet into the tributary) of the Umpqua River mainstem between the Scottsburg Bridge (Hwy 38) and the River Forks Park Boat Ramp. These areas are critical for juvenile steelhead that seek refuge in the cooler tributaries as mainstem water temperatures reach 70+ degrees.

Fall Chinook fishing is slow, but hopefully will get better as we move into late summer.

2018 STOCKING SCHEDULE and STOCKING MAP

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

9/13 – The good news is the ODFW did the right thing and increased the 3,500 coho quota to 7,600 – an increase of 117 percent. The bad news is that if they had not done that, the 2,739 coho salmon caught and kept in the ocean would have represented more than 78 percent of the original quota.

Lake Marie, which received two recent trout plants, should be fishing well for trout. Trout fishing should be improving for native, carryover and searun trout in larger coastal lakes like Siltcoos, Tahkenitch, and Tenmile lakes.

There should be plenty of planted trout left in the north arm of Cleawox Lake, which is essentially disconnected from the main body of the lake and therefore receives very little fishing pressure – even though many trout planted in the spring end up in the north arm.

Bluegills should still be biting well in Eel and Loon lakes, but they won’t be near the shoreline or in shallow water like they were in the spring and summer.

Striped bass should be biting better in slightly cooler water on the Smith and Coquille rivers.

Ocean crabbing out of Winchester Bay has been very good, although some crabbers were griping about the recent dredging.

Most serious bottomfish anglers have found they like the long leader technique that allows them to retain ten mid-depth bottomfish per day in marine waters at least 240 feet deep.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for Sept 8th

Willamette Valley/Metro – Mixed reports are coming from the troll and anchor fleet in the only remaining open stretch of the Columbia River, Warrior Rock to Bonneville Dam (and of course upstream of Bonneville too). This river reach will remain open until September 14th, when only the upstream of Bonneville Dam reach will be open until further notice. Anglers are reminded that the entire Columbia River is closed to summer steelhead for the remainder of the year.

Chinook counts at Bonneville Dam are tracking ahead of last year, but only by a little. Coho counts are way ahead of last year.

Trollers are taking the lion’s share of Chinook in the Bonneville to Warrior Rock stretch, trolling 360 flashers and 3.5 spinners in copper and red as well as brass/green and red. Anglers fishing close to the bottom of the river are finding the best success.

Focus will remain on the mainstem Columbia, but anglers casting spinners near the mouths of the Sandy and Clackamas Rivers should start seeing some success for coho. Fresh fish should enter in fair numbers for the next 3 weeks. Coho are known for being lock-jawed, a lot like the summer steelhead that have been residing in these rivers for months now.

Northwest Oregon – Chinook are being caught with more regularity in the Tillamook district. Trollers were taking fish in the jaws of Tillamook, Nehalem and Nestucca estuaries on the weekend’s soft tide series, the Salmon, Alsea and Siletz should also produce fair catches. Hatchery coho are starting to show in the Tillamook and Nehalem systems as well. The estuary hatchery coho season isn’t productive for long, action will taper by the 3rd week of September.

The unique “any salmon” season opens on September 7th, where any 2 salmon may be retained in the ocean fishery. Wild and hatchery coho or Chinook may be retained on Fridays and Saturdays in September, or until the coho quota of 3,500 fish is attained. Fishing should be good.

The tidewater sections of the Nehalem, Trask, Nestucca, Tillamook, Necanicum, Salmon, Siletz and Alsea Rivers should all have some Chinook available to trollers and bobber fishers. Bobber fishermen seem to have their best luck towards low slack, while trollers often fare best around high tide. These systems, along with their respective estuaries should remain fair to good until the first fall rains send them upstream to spawn.

Astoria area – Buoy 10 anglers have been perplexed in recent days. The Buoy 10 bite has slowed dramatically and is sporadic at best. With Chinook being closed from Buoy 10 to Warrior Rock near Kalama, coho will remain the only option for estuary anglers. That bite has not been productive.

Ocean anglers were given another 2 days in the North of Falcon fishery out of the Columbia River, they were gravely disappointed. There is no other descriptive words than “biological desert” for the 2-day ocean coho opener. We appear headed for a slow September here.

Albacore tuna showed up in mass over the weekend around 40 miles west out of Astoria. Although the albacore weren’t large, they were plentiful.

Central and Eastern Oregon – Our Friend Tim Moran will be off the grid for a week, but he’ll provide a good report in next week’s TGF.

Meanwhile, HERE is the detailed report from the ODF&W website.

Southwest – From ODF&W

Chinook are being caught in a number of SW Zone location including the Rogue Bay at Gold Beach, and in bays and lower sections of rivers like the Coos, Coquille, and Umpqua.
Smallmouth bass fishing continues to be a fishing bright spot in the south and mainstem Umpqua.

The upper Rogue River above Lost Creek Reservoir has been stocked throughout the summer, including the week before Labor Day, and anglers should find plenty of trout throughout the late summer.

Trout fishing in higher elevation lake continues to be good. Anglers should consider Diamond, Lemolo, Hemlock, Lake in the Woods and Lake Marie.

September is bringing big changes for anglers in the Rogue watershed:
The artificial fly season is underway on the upper Rogue between Fishers Ferry boat ramp and Cole Rivers Hatchery. Between Sept. 1 and Oct. 31, anglers may only fish artificial flies using any type rod/reel: no added weights or attachments except a bubble. This reach of the Rogue is open to fishing for hatchery summer steelhead and trout.

Water levels at many reservoirs throughout the Rogue are dropping quickly, so boat ramp access can change quickly. The good news—anglers willing to fish from shore or from inflatables can have a terrific time this fall fishing at Hyatt, Emigrant, Fish Lake, or even Agate Lake.

Anglers wanting to fish from trailered boats in the Rogue watershed have an opportunity at Lost Creek, Applegate, and Howard Prairie (for small boats). Bass fishing is good now. Trout fishing will only improve as the weather cools.

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

The ocean fin-clipped coho season is over but the catch data is currently only available through August 26th and 32.7 percent of the 35,000 fin-clipped coho quota had been retained. The northern portion of our zone had the best catch rate, which can be almost wholly explained by the difference in wild to fin-clipped coho salmon ratios.

Comparing the two busiest ports in our zone should make this difference apparent. Through August 26th, Newport, the busiest port, had 10,755 angler trips and 5,742 of the 13,252 cohos caught were retained fin-clipped cohos (more than 43 percent). Heading into the season’s last week, Newport is our zone’s most successful port with .58 retained salmon per angler-trip.

Winchester Bay, our zone’s second busiest port with 6,915 angler-trips has 1264 of the 8997 cohos caught that were fin-clipped and keepable (14 percent). Charleston’s percentage of fin-clipped cohos was even worse at 13 percent. So it should be no surprise that Winchester Bay’s and Charleston’s catch rates are a rather dismal .14 and .13 salmon per angler-trip respectively.

It is sadly ironic that the large numbers of wild coho hanging out off Winchester Bay and Charleston seemed to have “disappeared” prior to the ocean nonselective season which begins on September 7th.

Crabbing in the ocean is very good and will legal until October 15th. Crabbing in the lower Umpqua River is also very good and is legal the entire year.

Striped bass on the Smith River is the area’s most “hush-hush” fishery – so getting an accurate report is difficult. But it is almost certainly quite slow with a few fish taken after dark. Striper fishing on the Coquille River between Bandon and Coquille is very inconsistent but can be surprisingly productive with the best fishing at night.

Smallmouth bass fishing on the Umpqua River is very good. A very few smallmouths are being caught on the Smith River. But the most overlooked quality smallmouth fishery in our area is the South Fork of the Coquille River below Powers.

Anglers fishing for bottom fish need to remember that waters deeper than 30 fathoms are closed to conventional bottom fish techniques and there is an emergency closure on the retention of cabezon. Long leader fishing for some species of mid-depth bottom fish is still legal in waters more than 40 fathoms deep.

2018 STOCKING SCHEDULE AND STOCKING MAP

SW Washington – From WDF&W

Salmon/Steelhead:

Nothing new from the WDF&W web site, but you can go HERE for previous week’s reports.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for August 31

This weekend (Sept. 1-2) is a Free Fishing Weekend in Oregon when no license, tag or endorsement is needed to fish, crab and clam anywhere in Oregon that’s open to fishing. As an angler, you know how much fun fishing is. This is a great weekend to share that fun with others.

Willamette Valley/Metro – Fall Chinook passage is slow to go at Bonneville Dam, but that’s not stopping motivated anglers from trying their hand at Pro-trolling in the Portland to Longview stretch as numbers grow in the region. Catches have yet to take off, and with little time remaining in the Tongue Point (near Astoria) to Warrior Rock (near the mouth of the Lewis River) fishery, anglers will have little time to score. That reach closes on September 2nd, but will remain open upstream of Warrior Rock to Bonneville Dam through September 14th. Anchor anglers had the best chance on the most recent strong tide series. Overall, the Chinook run is tracking slightly behind last year’s return, as expected.

Summer steelhead haven’t fared as well. The states closed the mainstem Columbia River to the retention of steelhead effective last Monday. Returns are expected to come in lower than last year. A section of the John Day is also closed, from Tumwater Falls downstream to its confluence with the Columbia.

It’s too early to gauge the coho return, but the run is tracking slightly ahead of last year.

The Clackamas and Sandy still have summer steelhead available, and with the cooler weather, rafting traffic has slowed. These residualized fish remain quite timid however, but the overcast skies and cooler weather has improved opportunity. Coho are soon to show in each of these metro tributaries too. Pro guide Jeff Stoeger of O2BFISHN (503-704-7920) reports, “This week’s report we were hoping for more rain than what we received and the forecast doesn’t show any rain in next week’s forecast. When we do get that first good rain, we will see some coho show up in the lower river. They’re catching fish off the mouth of the Sandy using spinners and casting plugs. The upper river still has some fish but they are on the darker side.”

More trout are coming to Willamette Valley lakes this week, check the ODF&W web site for details on which lakes offer the best opportunity.

Northwest Oregon – It hasn’t been a fantastic week for Chinook fishers in the Tillamook region. Fall Chinook are soon due to almost every north coast system, and catches have been recorded already. Action was reported as slow on the Nehalem early in the week, but tides will weaken and action should pick up at the bay entrances over the Labor Day weekend.

The Nehalem, Tillamook, Nestucca, Salmon, Alsea and Siletz River mouths should all be fair prospects over the long weekend. Overall, the fall return isn’t expected to be tremendous, but catchable numbers will certainly be in order. Troll herring on the bottom during outgoing tide, but stratify baits on the incoming, especially around high tide. Hatchery coho should be available on the Nehalem and Tillamook Bay systems.

Ocean salmon fishing for coho closes on September 3rd, with nearly 70% of the quota remaining. Many wild coho were caught during the open season, a good sign for the September 7th opener that will run every Friday and Saturday through the end of the month or the quota of 3,500 fish is harvested.

Astoria area – The Buoy 10 fishery closed last Friday for Chinook, but remains open for hatchery coho. Anglers are witnessing fair catches of coho at or near Buoy 10 itself. Lower Desdemona Sands has also been productive recently.

Softer tides over the weekend should prompt fair to good catches of Chinook above Tongue Point using spinners or bait at high tide and the first part of outgoing. Again, this reach closes after September 2nd.

Central and Eastern Oregon – From our Friend Tim Moran: Check back later for an update.

Southwest – From ODF&W

Several area waterbodies are scheduled to be stocked the week of Aug. 27 – just in time for some holiday fishing. They include Red Top Lake, Clearwater Bay 2, Rogue above Lost Creek Reservoir, Marie Lake, Cooper Creek Reservoir, Lemolo Reservoir, Bowman Pond, Lake in the Woods, Ben Irving Reservoir and Hemlock Lake.

2018 STOCKING SCHEDULE AND STOCKING MAP

A number of fire closures are in effect near various southwest water bodies. ODFW personnel have done their best to compile the most up to date closures for specific angling destinations below. However, due to dynamic fire behavior, situations can change and anglers should consult with web links and phone numbers, and response agencies before they decide to visit.

Salmon fishing is open from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mountain with a limit of two salmon per day. The fin-clipped coho season opened on June 30 and will be open until Sept. 3 or attaining the quota of 35,000 fin-clipped coho. As of August 19, there is 70 percent of the quota remaining.

The All-Depth halibut quota remaining is 42 percent as of Aug. 19. The next all-depth fishing days for the Central Coast will be Aug. 31-Sept 1.

Chinook and coho are being caught from the shore at Half Moon Bay and Osprey Point in Winchester Bay.

Fall Chinook anglers are still doing well in the Rogue Bay of Gold Beach.

Fall Chinook are around in several other rivers and the best fishing will be in the bays and lower sections of rivers like the Coos, Coquille, and Umpqua.

Smallmouth bass fishing continues to be a fishing bright spot in the south and mainstem Umpqua.

SW Washington – From WDF&W

Salmon/Steelhead:

Elochoman River – 4 bank anglers had no catch.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 12 bank anglers had no catch. Above the I-5 Br: 17 bank rods kept 1 chinook and released 2 chinook. 33 boats/87 rods kept 18 chinook, 3 jacks, 26 steelhead and released 6 chinook, 7 jacks and 4 steelhead.

Kalama River – 1 bank angler had no catch. Lewis River – 1 boat/1 rod had no catch.

Wind River – 2 boats/2 rods had no catch.

Drano Lake – 15 boats/33 rods kept 7 chinook and released 3 steelhead.

Klickitat River – 3 bank anglers had no catch.

Columbia River Tributaries

Cowlitz River: Until further notice, the closed waters section below the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery Barrier Dam is 400’, at the posted markers.

Wind River: from the mouth to 400’ below Shepherd Falls, effective August 18, 2018 until further notice, closed for steelhead retention and closed to night fishing for salmon and steelhead.

Drano Lake: effective August 18, 2018 until further notice, closed for steelhead retention and closed to night fishing for salmon and steelhead.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

 

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Oregon Fishing Reports for August 24th

Willamette Valley/Metro – Although the mainstem Columbia River fall Chinook fishery has yet to take off locally, it’s only a matter of days as salmon counts are beginning to build at Bonneville Dam. Soon, trollers working Pro-trolls and spinners will be working from Bonneville to Longview, hooking up salmon to 30+ pounds as peak migration is about to happen.

Steelhead counts remain depressed on the mainstem, the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission enacted regulations closing the popular mouth of the Deschutes troll fishery giving steelhead a cold water refuge on their upstream migration.

Coho are starting to ascend the Bonneville facility, although they are hard to catch in this reach of river.

Pro guide Jeff Stoeger of O2BFISHN (503-704-7920) reports, “This week the Sandy still has fish but the fishing has slowed way down. The fish are on the dark side and should be getting ready to start spawning. The weather forecast is for rain over the weekend and if does happen we will see the river really go off color for the ground is so dry that the rain will wash all the dust and topsoil off causing the river to muddy up.  If we continue to get rains over the next few weeks, we could start to see some coho show up in the river. The counts are starting to go up. ”

Northwest Oregon – Effort is picking up for salmon out of Garibaldi, as the fall run of Chinook start to make their way back to most north coast systems. Although Tillamook Bay is an option this time of year, the Nehalem is peaking for summer Chinook right now, with fall Chinook soon to follow. Anglers were working the jaws at Wheeler pretty hard over the weekend with some success, but stronger tides this weekend should produce fair catches at Wheeler into next week. Hatchery coho should start to make a showing as well.

Upper Tillamook Bay should start to produce some fresh Chinook and coho over the weekend as well, anglers should work the high tide in the upper bay or at the jaws near high slack. The peak is still weeks away however.

The Nestucca, Salmon, Alsea and Siletz Rivers should also start to produce better catches. Chinook start to show in good numbers from now through mid-October.

Friendly seas will likely produce interest in offshore albacore fishing, it should be excellent when anglers find the schools of fish.

Bottomfishing remains excellent and crabbing should pick up as well although many of the keeper males will still be in a soft-shell state.

Astoria area – Although Chinook catches in the Buoy 10 fishery were excellent prior to the weekend, action tapered early this week. The Tongue Point area produced over the soft tide series, but Chinook action will likely pick up prior to the closure (Buoy 10 to Tongue Point) after Friday’s effort. It’s too early to tell how the fishery performed overall, but some quality Chinook were taken this month.

The Chinook fishery will remain open above Tongue Point through early September so opportunity should continue through that closure as well. Chinook were more receptive to spinners in the warmer waters above Tongue Point.

Coho catches are on the increase, and the Buoy 10 area will remain open for fin-clipped coho only, but action is unlikely to pick up until the end of the month and into September. Coho were running large and plentiful prior to the ocean closure so anglers should be in for some good fishing. The minus tide series should start to produce fair coho catches off of the beach at Fort Stevens State Park. Anglers cast spinners or plunk herring just off the bottom in this popular fishery.

Central and Eastern Oregon – From our Friend Tim Moran:

Deschutes River – Wickiup to Sunriver – fishing is fair for brown trout casting Rapalas, spoons and spinners. Fly fishing with big weighted streamers is also good.

Lower Deshutes – Steelhead are showing in fishable numbers from the mouth to Sherars Falls (the river is closed from the mouth to Moody). The river remains under-fished due to the fire and lack of camping areas and facilities.

Prineville Reservoir – Has been and still is a great weekend spot to catch fish. If you fish worms you’ll catch everything from trout to bass, crappie and bullheads.

Crane Prairie Reservoir – Trout are in the channels and chironomids, leeches and damsel imitations are taking fish. Mornings and the last hour of daylight are best.

Crooked River – Cold water is good water! Fishing for Redband Rainbows is good.

Antelope Flat Reservoir – Lot’s of holdover fish as well as some recently stocked brood fish. This fishery is worth a trip. Fall should be really good!

Metolius River – I’ve seen some pic’s recently of some brute Bull Trout being landed on the Met. As the Kokanee continue pushing into the river the fishing should only get better.

Metolius Pond – This fishery just opened to kids (under 17) and disabled anglers. It’s at the Wizard Falls hatchery and I’m guessing the fishing there is REALLY GOOD! A great stop for the kids and the Met has awesome camping areas.

Southwest – From ODF&W

Salmon anglers are reporting mixed results on the Coos.

There are decent numbers of Half-pounders and adult steelhead in the lower Rogue, where lower water conditions are ideal for anglers swinging flies or tossing spinners.
There also are few Chinook being caught around the mouth of the Umpqua.

With reports of a fair number of wild coho being caught in the bays and oceans, remember to land these fish quickly and don’t remove them from the water, if possible.

Trout fishing continues to be good at Howard Prairie Reservoir despite low water conditions.

Smallmouth bass fishing continues to be a fishing bright spot in the south and mainstem Umpqua.

During the hot weather, the best trout fishing will be early in mornings at higher lakes like Diamond, Lemolo, Hemlock, Lake in the Woods, Lake Marie, and the high Cascade lakes in the Umpqua basin.

From Humbug Mountain to the OR/CA border, salmon fishing is open with a limit of two salmon per day but no retention of coho.

The All-Depth halibut quota has not been updated yet. If there is enough quota left the next All-Depth fishing days for the Central Coast will be Aug. 31-Sept 1. The Nearshore halibut season is open seven days a week and as of Aug. 12, there is 22 percent of the quota remaining.

For the southern Oregon Subarea, halibut is open 7 days a week through Oct. 31 or attaining the quota of 8,982 lbs. As of Aug. 12, there is 64 percent of the quota remaining.

Tuna have moved offshore over 50 miles. Most recreational tuna anglers have stopped fishing for tuna until they get closer.

And from Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

Lake Marie was stocked this week with 800 trophy rainbows. In some years this late-season plant will immediately go deep due to warm surface water and not bite well for several days.

As for river salmon, the Rogue River continues to produce well despite the fact that not one keepable salmon has been caught in the ocean out of Gold Beach.

Chinook salmon angling in the Umpqua River between Winchester Bay and Reedsport was much improved last week – possibly due to slightly cooler temperatures – but if water temperatures drop very much, the Chinooks may zip upriver and anglers will no longer have multiple chances to catch them.

Crabbing seems to be improving weekly.

Retention of cabezon was prohibited beginning Saturday morning, August 18, 2018. Total mortality (catch plus discard mortality) of cabezon in Oregon’s recreational bottomfish fishery was projected to meet or exceed the annual recreational harvest guideline of 16.8 metric tons by Friday, August 17. Anglers will be asked to safely release any cabezon encountered.

Fishing for pinkfin (redtail surfperch) in the surf at most of our local beaches continues to be very good.

Smith River is still giving up a few stripers to a select few close-mouthed night anglers, but the best striper fishing recently has been on the lower Coquille River above Bandon. Very few big stripers are being caught.

The albacore tuna season doesn’t seem to be over, but the right ocean conditions to reach them don’t seem to happen very often.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for August 4

Willamette Valley/Metro – Although Chinook are now “on the table” for metro area anglers on the mainstem Columbia, peak passage is still several weeks away. Reports of Chinook are coming from the Kalama area however, certainly encouraging given the sub-par spring and summer run this year.

Steelhead anglers are still taking a few fish, but water conditions remain challenging. Coon striped shrimp and spin-n-glos are taking fish from Longview to Bonneville Dam, but catches are sparse given the numbers passing the fish ladder right now.

Anglers interested in the Sandy and Clackamas are still pursuing summer steelhead, but given recent temperatures that are drawing swimmers and rafters, most are willing to wait the arrival of coho come September. Steelheaders need to employ stealthy low-water techniques in the current state of these rivers.

Pro guide Jeff Stoeger of O2BFISHN (503-704-7920) reports, “Well this week we had some of the warmest weather so far this year. The weather hasn’t stop a few anglers from catching a few springers in the upper river. There was a short video on face book showing a nice springer being caught. I attend a ODFW meeting on Tuesday night and was informed that they have at least 845 hatchery springers back so far to bull run net pins. ODFW has 55 pairs of springers that will be used for next years  stock of fish. ODFW said that they have been able to keep the stray rate down to less than 1% that they permission to increase the number of springers to be released next year. They plan to increase the numbers of fish from 132,000 to 200,000 thousand. ODFW is also going to try to get the springers to return sooner in the year when there is more water so they can get back sooner and not have to deal with the warmer water.”

Northwest Oregon – Calm seas opened up plenty of opportunity for salmon anglers south of Cape Falcon where only a fraction of the coho quota has been eaten up. Success remains sporadic but improving from Newport to Garibaldi. The season goes longer than normal, but remains fin-clipped only for coho through August and into September. Any Chinook, wild or hatchery, above the 24” minimum size limit, may be retained in the ocean or any north coast estuary.

Strong tides limited success at the jaws for Nehalem Bay summer Chinook anglers, but that should change this weekend. Calm seas and a softer tide series should produce fair catches for anglers trolling herring on the bottom during the last half of outgoing tide.

The nearshore halibut fishery has been yielding good results out of Garibaldi. Slow drifting large herring near the bottom in 90 to 140 foot of water has been producing fair to good catches. The season’s last all-depth opener takes place tomorrow and Saturday. Newport will likely continue to produce the best catches, but Depoe Bay, Pacific City and Garibaldi should also produce a few fish.

Ocean crabbing is fair, but more soft-shelled males are making up a significant portion of the catch. There are plenty of small females too, likely preparing for the fall spawn.

Calm seas inspired tuna anglers to venture far offshore in search of albacore. Catches have been oddly sporadic and fishers are having to venture nearly 50 miles before the schools are found. Action should improve into August.

Freshwater anglers will continue to be challenged for summer steelhead and sea-run cutthroat trout. A rainstorm is desperately needed.

Astoria area – The famed Buoy 10 season opened up yesterday. Some Chinook were caught above the bridge on the Washington side with a good handful of Rogue strain fish retained. Rogue fish, grown in Young’s Bay for the gillnet fleet, can easily be identified by a left ventricle fin clip. They make excellent table fare. The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission decided to keep the Young’s Bay Bubble closure in effect despite the potential economic boon to rural Astoria. It’ll be another week before catchable numbers of Chinook start to show in the river. There are some Tule Chinook in the catches as well. High tide is best to target these fish.

Chinook catches in the ocean remain very slow, but coho action has been consistent north of the river mouth in 80 to 100 foot of water.

Central and Eastern Oregon – From our Friend Tim Moran:

Deschutes River –  The lower south of Sherars Falls is going to be iffy until the fires are brought under control.  I would probably avoid that this weekend.  Fishing from Maupin upstream should be good -especially with cooler weather. A little light rain could trigger some epic PMD hatches in the morning too if we get it.

Prineville Reservoir – Still great – still floating worms on a sliding egg sinker and power bait near the dam from the bank or a boat.

Odell Lake – I know guys are catching fish – I know there is an algae bloom – I hear it’s worse in the south end of the lake.  I’ll be there Friday so I’ll have a first hand report next week…Stay tuned!

Crane Prairie Reservoir – The boys a COFR are killing big bass here on plastics and top water.  I’ve seen some fish pushing 5lbs coming out of there.

Paulina Lake – still fishermen are taking rainbows using powerbait and worm/egg combos  I like to anchor in about 30 to 40 feet of water (use a bow and stern anchor).  Fish powerbait on a small size 18 gold treble hook and use 4 lb flourocarbon leader.

East Lake – I saved the best for last – East is fishing really good now. Trollers are getting big kokanee and some nice rainbows and browns too.

Get MUCH more detail on Tim’s report in the full length version of our newsletter. If you want to subscribe for about $0.50 cents per week, go HERE.

Southwest – From ODF&W

The winds finally died down last Friday allowing anglers to get out for bottomfish, among other things. Reports are that rockfish fishing is scratchy, anglers are having to work for them, might be due to some colder water that the winds pushed nearshore. Lingcod has slowed down some as well; however there are still some good-size lingcod being landed, it just may take some more time and effort than it did a few weeks ago. Reminder that as of April 1, the bottomfish fishery is restricted to inside of the 30 fathom regulatory line.

PACIFIC HALIBUT

The summer all-depth fishery opens this Friday and Saturday (Aug. 3-4), and will be open every other Friday and Saturday until Oct. 31, or the quota is caught.

The Central Coast nearshore halibut fishery opened on Friday, June 1. When the winds have allowed anglers to get out, there has been limited success with nearshore halibut. The average weight of fish landed last week was around 21 pounds live weight.

The Southern Oregon Subarea (Humbug Mountain to the OR/CA Border) remains open 7 days per week.

Reminder that similar to the bottomfish fishery listed above, descending devices are mandatory when fishing for or retaining Pacific halibut.

Sport salmon fishing for Chinook is open in ocean waters from Cape Falcon (just North of Nehalem Bay) to the Oregon/California border for two salmon per day (all salmon except coho). Minimum sizes are 24-inches for Chinook and 20-inches for steelhead. Anglers are also reminded that within the 15 fathom depth contour off Tillamook Bay (Twin Rocks to Pyramid Rock) that all Chinook salmon must have a healed fin clip.

The hot spell continues in Southwest Oregon, and water temperatures are heating up, especially in lakes and reservoirs. To reduce stress on fish, fish early in the day when water temperatures are cooler. Avoid handling large numbers of fish. When releasing fish, handle the lure or hook and not the fish. Minimize the use of baited treble hooks if you plan to release trout.

With hot, dry conditions, it might be a good time to target half-pounders in the lower Rogue. Look for them hanging out near the tributary mouths where cooler water is still feeding into the mainstem.

The Rogue River above Lost Creek Reservoir is a hot spot for summer trout fishing, offering a great place to escape the heat of the valley, enjoy some beautiful scenery, and catch some nice trout. See more here.

Both brown and rainbow trout fishing has been good in Lemolo Reservoir.

Striper fishing is picking up in the Smith River.

Smallmouth bass fishing continues to be very good on the mainstem Coquille and South Coquille.

Largemouth bass and yellow perch fishing have been hot at Tenmile Lakes.

Smallmouth bass fishing continues to be good in the south and mainstem Umpqua. But please be aware that through Sept. 30, 2018 all fishing is closed within a radius of 200 feet from the mouths of all tributaries (including 200 feet into the tributary) of the Umpqua River mainstem between the Scottsburg Bridge (Hwy 38) and the River Forks Park Boat Ramp.

During the hot weather the best trout fishing will be early in mornings at higher lakes like Diamond, Lemolo, Hemlock, Lake in the Woods, and the high Cascade lakes in the Umpqua basin.

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

An emergency closure was enacted last week to protect wild summer steelhead and early returning fall chinook on the mainstem Umpqua River. The emergency regulation, covers the Umpqua River from the Scottsburg Bridge (Hwy. 38) to River Forks Boat Ramp in Roseburg. through September 30th – and may be extended, if necessary.

Above the Scottsburg Bridge angling is now is prohibited within a 200 feet radius of all tributaries in the Umpqua River and in the tributaries themselves from the mouth to 200 feet upstream. This emergency regulation protects wild summer steelhead and fall Chinook salmon that hold in and around tributaries looking for colder water. Currently, the Umpqua River has abnormally low flows and high water temperatures due to drought conditions.

Most of the freshwater lakes in our area offering decent early morning fishing for warm water fish.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for July 28

Willamette Valley/Metro – Summer steelhead remain the only viable option for Portland/Metro anglers for the near future. The mainstem Columbia at Bonneville Dam is still passing better than 1,000 fish per day, but the bite remains challenging for those fishing the warm waters of the river. The Columbia River Gorge is often the best reach to intercept steelhead this time of year.

The Sandy and Clackamas Rivers are also harboring summer steelhead, but anglers have to fish early and high in the river system to avoid conflict with rafters and inter-tubers seeking relief from the hot summer temperatures. These rivers will be busy all week with the splash and giggle crowd. Spring Chinook action has slowed as fish prepare for the spawning phase of their freshwater life-cycle.

Trout continue to get stocked in a few Willamette Valley area lakes and ponds and although lake temperatures are on the rise, early mornings and evenings should produce biters for persistent anglers.

Walleye fishing is heating up for gorge and reservoir anglers in the upper reaches of the Columbia, Catches in The Dalles and John Day Pools are impressive.

Pro guide Jeff Stoeger of O2BFISHN (503-704-7920) reports, “This week we’ve had to deal with extremely hot weather. The forecast is for the weather to stay warm for the next ten days. Jack Glass posted on Facebook a short video of a large school of springers heading up river. When I talked with Jack, he stated that there was large school heading up river and that those who fish the upper river should hit the river in the deep pools. The lure of choice has been spinners in size 4.” See more of Jeff’s report, including the forecast, in the full length version of our newsletter, costs about .50 cents per week!

Northwest Oregon – Rough weather has kept the small boat fleet off of the ocean for those interested in pursuing coho. Coho action should be peaking in the south  of Falcon (Manzanita) fishery as Columbia River coho make their way northward for the fall migration. Better weather is forecasted for the upcoming weekend, but tides will be stronger so pay attention to bar crossings.

The long-leader fishery continues to yield limits of a mix of slope rockfish. Nearshore rockfishing remains consistent too, with most of the charter fleet headed to the Arch Cape area in pursuit of black rockfish.

Nearshore halibut is also fair this time of year, with nearly ½ of the 25,856 pound quota already harvested. Neahkanie Mountain to Nehalem remains a popular and productive area to target halibut.

Ocean crabbing is fair, but about half of the catch are in a softshelled state and unfit for harvest. There’s simply little meat in these crab during the molt this time of year. Bay crabbing is challenging at this time, despite good tides.

Offshore anglers are chomping at the bit to head to albacore waters. The next sign of calm seas will draw a lot of interest as we enter peak season for tuna between 12 and 35 pounds. Plan on traveling 30 to 40 miles offshore.

Astoria area – The catch and release sturgeon bite has slowed in the lower Columbia, but the effort is still worthwhile with many fish exceeding 6-foot in length according to current catch statistics. Fish are in the deeper water  now with Tongue Point producing good catches on Monday. Use fresh anchovies for bait.

Salmon fishing is fair for coho off of the mouth of the Columbia River but the ocean has been rough and jellyfish hampered success rates on both sides of the river on Monday. Chinook catches are rare right now, but may improve as we near early August.

The famed Buoy 10 season opens on August 1st, but catches are likely to be slow to start, especially with a depressed return this year.

Southwest – From ODF&W The first part of last week had some good bottom fishing; however, the winds kicked up later in the week, bringing with them some colder water which have slowed fishing for bottomfish in general. Lingcod catches, while a bit better than normal for this time of year, and have slowed down. There are still some good-size lingcod being landed, it just may take some more time and effort than it did a few weeks ago. Reminder that as of April 1, the bottomfish fishery is restricted to inside of the 30 fathom regulatory line.

As of July 1, the general marine bag limit (rockfish, greenlings, etc.) is 4 fish. This reduction to the bag limit is necessary to keep total catches within annual quotas, and reduce the chance of an early closure of the recreational bottomfish fishery.

The longleader gear fishery outside of the 40 fathom regulatory line has been authorized to continue in April through September. Recent catches from the offshore longleader trips often consist of a nice grade of yellowtail, widow and canary rockfishes. Reminder that the Stonewall Bank Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation Area is closed to all bottomfish trips, including longleader trips.

The Central Coast Subarea spring all-depth fishery is closed. The summer all-depth fishery opens August 3-4, every other Friday and Saturday until Oct. 31, or the quota is caught.

Sport salmon fishing for Chinook is open in ocean waters from Cape Falcon (just North of Nehalem Bay) to the Oregon/California border for two salmon per day (all salmon except coho). Minimum sizes are 24-inches for Chinook and 20-inches for steelhead. Anglers are also reminded that within the 15 fathom depth contour off Tillamook Bay (Twin Rocks to Pyramid Rock) that all Chinook salmon must have a healed fin clip.

The hot spell continues in Southwest Oregon, and water temperatures are heating up, especially in lakes and reservoirs. To reduce stress on fish, fish early in the day when water temperatures are cooler. Avoid handling large numbers of fish. When releasing fish, handle the lure or hook and not the fish. Minimize the use of baited treble hooks if you plan to release trout.

With hot, dry conditions, it might be a good time to target half-pounders in the lower Rogue. Look for them hanging out near the tributary mouths where cooler water is still feeding into the mainstem.

The Rogue River above Lost Creek Reservoir is a hot spot for summer trout fishing, offering a great place to escape the heat of the valley, enjoy some beautiful scenery, and catch some nice trout. See more here.

During the hot summer days, trout anglers should target the Cascade lakes like Diamond and Lemolo, and other higher elevation locations like the Umpqua high lakes.
Recent reports suggest brown trout fishing has been good in Lemolo Reservoir.

Striper fishing is picking up in the Smith River.

Smallmouth bass fishing continues to be very good on the mainstem Coquille and South Coquille.

Largemouth bass and yellow perch fishing have been hot at Tenmile Lakes.

Smallmouth bass fishing continues to be good in the south and mainstem Umpqua.

During the hot weather the best trout fishing will be early in mornings at higher lakes like Diamond, Hemlock, Lake in the Woods, and the high Umpqua lakes.

Crabbing is picking up in Coos Bay, though many of the crab are still soft after molting.

2018 STOCKING SCHEDULE and STOCKING MAP

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

Anglers are, once again, able to float the lower Deschutes River after a severe fire burned virtually everything down to the riverbank. Anglers fishing from shore have to deal considerable ash and may be at risk if they already have respiratory problems. However, anglers fishing the lower Deschutes have reported normal fishing.

Although ocean salmon fishing success is improving from Charleston northward, no ports have success rates above .30 salmon per angler trip, except for Winchester Bay which has .46 salmon per angler trip.

Although no ocean-caught salmon have yet been reported, southern Oregon’s hottest salmon fishing has been the first four miles of the Rogue River above Gold Beach.

Some striped bass are still being caught in the Smith and Coquille rivers.

The spawning run of female redtail surfperch in the lower Umpqua River above Winchester Bay has rebounded strongly.

Tenmile Lakes trout fishing has dropped off, but fishing for largemouth bass and yellow perch has been fair to good. Eel Lake continues to offer the best mixed-bag freshwater fishing with largemouth and smallmouth bass, rainbow and cutthroat trout, black crappie, bluegills and brown bullheads taken last week.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for July 20

Willamette Valley/Metro – Although we’re witnessing peak passage for summer steelhead at Bonneville Dam, catches are far from impressive for lower Columbia beach plunkers and boaters. Some anglers are finding fair fishing downstream of the Cowlitz River, and in the Columbia River Gorge, where rocky outcroppings concentrate fish for anglers to intercept. Coon striped shrimp remain a favorite, but plugs and spin-n-glos are also producing some catches.

Spring Chinook passage at Willamette Falls continues on, as the basin’s last trickle of salmon make their way upstream in unpleasant water temperatures. Fish are reluctant to bite, but the Santiam River system, along with the McKenzie should see an influx of fish in the coming weeks. The run looks over-predicted, a disappointing trend for this year’s collective returns with the exception being sockeye salmon.

The Clackamas remains a fair-at-best option for summer steelhead, while the Sandy may produce some spring Chinook and summer steelhead in the glacially colored water from the heat wave this week. Pro guide Jeff Stoeger of O2BFISHN (503-704-7920) reports, “There are more swimmers and tubers than anglers this week, as hot weather has drawn interest from this crowd to keep cool this week. The river is currently running at 7.9 foot and will only drop more over the next few weeks. The water has about 1.5 foot of visibility and will only cloud more as glacial melt influences turbidity.”

Numerous lakes in the region, and Willamette Valley in general, will be receiving robust plants of rainbow trout in the legal and trophy size range. Anglers will have to fish deeper as fish will seek cooler depths, but should still succumb to trolled baits and lures.

Northwest Oregon – Rough seas have kept many saltwater anglers from getting outside this week. The minus tide series hasn’t helped either.

For ocean salmon anglers, statistics show you are over three times likely to catch a Chinook than a coho, and if you do catch a coho, it’s three times likely to be a wild fish requiring release versus a hatchery fish for retention. Only about 1% of the 35,000 hatchery fish quota has been caught to date.

High winds and an uncomfortable swell remains in the forecast, likely to keep most of the smaller sport fleet at bay for much of the week. Softer tides will make for safer bar crossings however.

Bottomfishing would be good if the weather cooperated and nearshore halibut are awaiting calmer seas too.

Tuna trippers are anxious to get out, but the weather is keeping wiser anglers tied to the dock for the time being. Albacore should be well distributed off of the Oregon Coast.

Not many anglers are taking advantage of good sea-run cutthroat fishing. The tidewaters of the Trask, Wilson, Tillamook, Nestucca and Nehalem should all produce fair catches of quality trout. Trolling Ford Fender lake trolls with worms is a standard strategy.

A few summer Chinook have been taken in Nehalem Bay, where action peaks the second half of July and into early August. Softer tides should produce some catches towards the jaws this weekend.

The Wilson and Nestucca remain fair-at-best options for summer steelhead. Cloudy mornings are beneficial.

Astoria area – The catch and release sturgeon fishery has slowed, but action is still worthwhile. Most fish are larger than 40 inches with fish over 6 foot fairly common.

The razor clam season is now closed along Clatsop area beaches, and won’t re-open until mid-September.

Ocean salmon fishing out of the Columbia is only fair.

Southwest – From ODF&W

Both lingcod and rockfish are back on the bite on the Central Coast, although limits (2 lingcod and 4 rockfish) remain infrequent, landings have improved. Reminder that as of April 1, the bottomfish fishery is restricted to inside of the 30 fathom regulatory line.

As of July 1, the general marine bag limit (rockfish, greenlings, etc.) is 4 fish. This reduction to the bag limit is necessary to keep total catches within annual quotas, and reduce the chance of an early closure of the recreational bottomfish fishery.

The Central Coast nearshore halibut fishery opened on Friday, June 1. During the last couple of weeks, anglers were bringing in 2-3 Petrale sole per angler along with some halibut.

The Central Coast Subarea spring all-depth fishery has; not enough quota for additional days. The summer all-depth fishery opens August 3-4, every other Friday and Saturday until October 31, or the quota is caught.

Sport salmon fishing for Chinook is open in ocean waters from Cape Falcon (just North of Nehalem Bay) to the Oregon/California border for two salmon per day (all salmon except coho). Minimum sizes are 24-inches for Chinook and 20-inches for steelhead. Anglers are also reminded that within the 15 fathom depth contour off Tillamook Bay (Twin Rocks to Pyramid Rock) that all Chinook salmon must have a healed fin clip.

The hot spell continues in Southwest Oregon, and water temperatures are heating up, especially in lakes and reservoirs. To reduce stress on fish, fish early in the day when water temperatures are cooler. Avoid handling large numbers of fish. When releasing fish, handle the lure or hook and not the fish. Minimize the use of baited treble hooks if you plan to release trout.

The lower Rogue continues to be a hot spot for Chinook with anglers catching fish from the bay up to Indian Creek.
Hatchery Spring Chinook excess to brood needs are being recycled back into the upper Rogue fishery. Last week the fish were released at the Dodge Bridge boat ramp.

The Rogue River above Lost Creek Reservoir is a hot spot for summer trout fishing, offering a great place to escape the heat of the valley, enjoy some beautiful scenery, and catch some nice trout. See more here.

Lemolo Reservoir can be a good option for fishing during hot weather.

Smallmouth bass fishing has been good on the mainstem Coquille, as well as the South and Middle Fork Coquille.
Yellow perch fishing has been very good in Tenmile Lakes.

Smallmouth bass fishing continues to be good in the south and mainstem Umpqua.

During the hot weather the best trout fishing will be early in mornings at higher lakes like Diamond, Hemlock, Lake in the Woods, and the high Umpqua lakes.
2018 STOCKING SCHEDULE and STOCKING MAP

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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