Oregon Fishing Reports for November 17

Willamette Valley/Metro – With all metro fisheries winding down for the year, anglers will be looking forward to the next run of fish due into the rivers in the coming weeks.

Late-run coho should still be available in both the Sandy and Clackamas Rivers but most of the remaining coho are likely of wild origin, requiring release. Eagle Creek hatchery took in just over 2,100 coho by November 2nd, meeting their egg taking requirement. Cedar Creek hatchery has their quota for the year as well. Excess coho still in good shape go to local area food banks to feed the hungry. Pro guide Jeff Stoeger (503-704-7920) reports, “This week’s report starts off with reports that the first winter steelhead was caught in the lower section of the river below Dabney Park. The fish was a native and it weighed about 7lbs and it was nickel bright. The river is on a roller coaster with river levels going up and dropping over night. The current river level is at 8.12 and four days earlier it was over 9 ft. The weather forecast over the next ten days shows chance of rain next Tuesday and Wednesday with the temps running in low 50’s. We need to have more frequent storms in order to put more snow in the mountains and also bring the river levels to normal levels. “

Another prolonged week of dry weather will keep local area streams dropping and clearing, making for tough fishing conditions for those still in pursuit of coho and summer steelhead. Fish this late into the season will make for poor table fare, but still provide a good fight on light gear.

Sturgeon fishermen working the Portland Harbor are still yielding good catches of both keeper and undersize fish, the action should last well into the winter months.

Although the region’s trout stocking program is slowing, there remains ample biting fish in some of the larger lake systems in the area. Henry Hagg Lake should stay productive through the month of November, especially if the temperatures remain stable.

Northwest Oregon – With little effort out for Tillamook Bay fall Chinook, it’s hard to gauge just how productive the fishery is. November Chinook are largely destined for the Wilson and Kilchis River systems, but it’s quite apparent that the entire Tillamook watershed is witnessing low returns this season. The extreme lower reaches of some of these river systems remain open as well, but check the news release link from the ODF&W web site for updated regulations.

Anglers that targeted chum salmon for catch and release fishing on the Miami, Kilchis and Wilson River systems will find that option closing after November 15th. These fish provide good sport, but leaving spawning fish unmolested is important too, as chum fry provide an important food base for other important species such as coho smolts in the spring. Most north coast rivers will remain open for winter steelhead and some start to show around Thanksgiving in some district systems. It’s not unrealistic to believe we’ll see a better return of steelhead this season and next as ocean conditions improved for this year’s returning brood.

Ocean conditions for nearshore bottomfishing have been decent and good catches of sea bass and lingcod have been had by those out there trying. The ocean swell is expected to rise through the weekend, but favorable conditions may come about early next week. Ocean crabbing re-opens on December 1st and it doesn’t look like the commercial fleet will start before late December.

Lower Columbia River – Soft tides will offer up good morning and afternoon crabbing options out of Hammond. Low slack can be just as productive as high slack, especially on a soft tide exchange. Be cautious of the ever-changing wind forecast however.

Central and Eastern Oregon – From our friend Tim Moran 

Deshutes River – Steelhead fishing remains spotty but there are fishable numbers in the river.  We got two Monday above the locked gate on small black and purple buggers under a small float/indicator.  Trout fishing remains good – mostly on nymphs but there is some BWO action especially when its overcast or we get a little light rain.

Metolius River –  There is almost always a BWO’s, October Caddis or midge hatch this time of the year but most of the time you will be casting nymphs to take trout.  The kokanee spawn is over so  the bull trout are turning back to hunting smaller game.

Crooked River – Fishing is good in the crooked and will remain so unless there is heavy rain in the area. Small BWO’s, Adams, or attractor patterns will draw strikes from rising trout.

Fall River – The Fall is a definite go to late fall and winter fishery.  The water is so cold the temp doesn’t change much no matter the season.  If there are rising fish look for BWO or midge hatches and get small.  Size 18 to 22 are the go to sizes for this river. You can fish small nymphs too.

It’s basically winter now so the reports get a bit harder to come-by.  But if you get a chance – fish do have to eat everyday so get out there!

You can see more of Tim’s report and an upcoming forecast for Central and Eastern Oregon by becoming a paid subscriber HERE. Paid subscribers get about FIVE TIMES the amount of information for fifty cents a week!

Southwest – From ODF&W 

Trout fishing in Hemlock Lake and Lake in the Woods can be great this time of year.

Bass fishing on the Umpqua has been surprisingly ok.

Anglers are still catching summer steelhead fishing on the North Umpqua, despite the poor return in general.

Fishing at Lost Creek Reservoir has been good with anglers catching trout up to 16-inches.

With still no snow in the forecast, Howard Prairie, Fish Lake, and Fourmile Lake are still great destinations to fish for trout, especially from personal watercraft such as kayaks, float tubes, or the bank.

Bottomfish anglers may now fish at all depths for the remainder of the year. The daily bag limit for marine fish is 5 plus 2 lingcod. The retention of cabezon is now closed for the remainder of the year.

Anglers may also choose to fish the offshore longleader fishery outside of the 40-fathom regulatory line which is open year round.

2018 STOCKING SCHEDULE and STOCKING MAP

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

With Tenmile Lakes finally getting their salmon, all three coastal salmon lakes now have fishable numbers of salmon in them and the next good rain should greatly improve salmon fishing in all three lakes..

The legal fishing area for salmon on Tahkenitch Lake is from the road that encircles the east end of the lake on Mallard and Five Mile arms down to the Highway 101 Bridge at the lower end of the lake.

On the south coast, the Elk River is producing some chinook salmon. but fishing success is confined to the lower river.

Perch fishing at the County Park on South Tenmile Lake slowed down from last weeks hot bite, but a number of nice-sized rainbow trout to more than 20-inches picked up most of the slack.

Just because the bass clubs have stopped having tournaments doesn’t mean you should stop fishing for bass. Although cold water has slowed fishing success, it hasn’t completely stopped it.

Bay and river crabbing remains fairly good for those using boats and even the dock crabbers are making fair catches if they put the time in.

Crabbers willing to drag or carry small boats into the “Triangle” have been doing very well and anglers fishing the South Jetty at Winchester Bay have been catching some decent-sized rockfish as well as some greenling and striped surfperch. Retention of cabezon is still closed. Offshore bottomfishing remains pretty much a “sure thing”.

Oregon’s third “Free Fishing Weekend” of this year will fall on November 23rd and 24th according to the regulations booklet and fishing licenses, shellfish licenses and salmon tags will not be required to fish, crab or clam during those two days – subject to current regulations and bag limits, of course. The reason that I say “according to the regulations booklet” is that “Free Fishing Weekends” generally fall on Saturdays and Sundays and November 23rd and 24th fall on Friday and Saturday. Perhaps Thanksgiving has something to do with it – but pay close attention and make sure you are fishing, crabbing or clamming on the proper days if you don’t have a license.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for November 9

Willamette Valley/Metro – Willamette River sturgeon fishing tops the list as the most viable fishery in the metro area right now. Catch and release prospects will remain good well into November, with many anglers easily taking double-digit counts using fresh sand shrimp and frozen smelt for bait. The fishery’s success is the reason a consumptive option is not on the table, success rates would have too much horsepower, causing managers to limit opportunity for a short run fishery. Another consumptive fishery is likely next spring for estuary fishers, but managers won’t make that decision for several more months.

The Sandy and Clackamas has had its run on hatchery coho. Although there will be a rare late returning straggler, the run is albeit over. The Cedar Creek Hatchery on the Sandy processed another 500 – 600 coho on Monday, completing its egg take for the season. Approximately 200,000 fertilized coho eggs are incubating at the hatchery right now, until they hatch out several weeks from now where they’ll be pond reared until release in the spring of 2020. The hatcher saw about a 1% return from smolt (juvenile) to adult, standard for most hatcheries these days. The mouth of Cedar Creek will be the obvious place to intercept late returning hatchery coho, using small baits and jigs to entice fish. Another prolonged dry spell is in the forecast so expect water conditions to be low and clear once again. Pro guide Jeff Stoeger (503-704-7920) reports, “The latest report that I can provide is that the river blew out last Friday and the river still hasn’t come back into shape. The river is light brown with a little bit of green tint to it. The current river level is down to 9ft and had dropped about 6 inches over the day. The next weather storm is forecasted for next Wednesday before we see the next rain showers. The freezing level is staying low so the river will drop and then jump with next rain showers. There was a good bump of fish that showed up when the river took a bounce last week.”

Although most of the upcoming trout plants will be made in the upper Willamette Valley lakes and ponds in the coming weeks, water bodies like Henry Hagg Lake and Canby Pond should carry over ample numbers of trout into the fall months. Fish should be on the bite before temperatures drop too low, making for an ideal fishery for many younger anglers.

Sorry, but registration for the 31st annual Hall of Fame Banquet is CLOSED, but if you still want to invest in the future of sportfishing, the Association of Northwest Steelheaders can certainly use your donation to help fulfill its mission. Please go HERE to donate. Thank you in advance!

Northwest Oregon – Although only Tillamook Bay remains open for the targeting and retention of Chinook, action is fair at best. Much of the effort has slowed, and catches remain subdued for a period of time that has historically been productive. Many anglers have given up on fall Chinook, waiting for winter steelhead to arrive, which won’t be in fishable numbers for another 6 weeks. In the meantime, at least until November 15th, chum salmon will exercise anglers on the Miami, Kilchis and Wilson Rivers. This too is a great fishery for newcomers and youngsters alike. The BnR scampi tails fished under a bobber can offer great action, catch and release is required.

ODF&W re-opened a portion of the Siletz River, HERE is the official press release.

The offshore forecast looks as if bottomfishing will again be on the table. Although most of the charter fleet has hung it up for the season, private boaters can take advantage of good numbers of lingcod and bottomfish both on and offshore. Ocean crabbing remains closed, but bay crabbing in most coastal estuaries is good.

Halibut and ocean salmon seasons are closed.

Lower Columbia River – Crabbing in the lower Columbia is excellent. A soft incoming tide this weekend should give crabbers an excellent opportunity for easy limits.

Central and Eastern Oregon – From our friend Tim Moran 

Fall River – The Fall River is fishing good from the campground to the hatchery and below the falls. Lots of big trout near the hatchery. Fish here but stand away from the bank and wear muted colors to have the best results. When fish are rising small blue wing olives and midges are usually what’s on the menu.

Crooked River – Flows are about 50 to 60 CFS but stable. There is good dry fly fishing almost all day on BWO, PMD and caddis patterns. Small nymphs under a small indicator or on a dry/ dropper always produce here too.

Ana River – the Ana in SE Oregon is a great fall and winter fishery. Most of it has to be drifted in pontoon boats but it’s worth the time if you’re over there.

Owyhee River – Trout fishing is good with hatches coming off in the afternoons. Small black midges and BWO’s are predominant but it never hurts to throw streamers for the big Browns that live here.

Fishing has slowed in the Prineville and Madras area lakes.

From ODF&W 

Bikini Pond, Taylor Lake and the Prineville Youth Fishing Pond have been stocked with legal and extra trophy trout, and fishing should be good.

On the lower Deschutes, steelhead are passing over Sherars Falls and fishing should be fair in the Maupin area.

Anglers have been catching fall Chinook at Sherars Falls on the Deschutes, and can expect good numbers of fish through October.

The Fall River was stocked recently and anglers report good fishing throughout the river.

On the John Day River, flows have increased and steelhead are starting to enter the river.

Trout fishing at Chickahominy Reservoir continues to be good to excellent.

Yellowjacket Lake has been recently stocked with 10- to 12-inch fish and fishing should be good.

This is the time of year when bass fishing on the upper Owyhee River can be good.

Upper Klamath Lake and Klamath River below Keno Dam fish well in November.

Klamath River below the powerhouse will have low flows until 2 p.m. — catch rates have been really high.

Ana River was stocked last week with 250 larger rainbow trout.

Cottonwood Meadows is turning out 19” rainbow trout!

Trout fishing at Heart Lake has been excellent – this is a great place to catch some large fish before snow restricts access.

Southwest – From ODF&W 

Trout fishing in Hemlock Lake and Lake in the Woods can be great this time of year.

Steelhead anglers should consider the middle and upper Rogue, where summer steelhead fishing continues to be good.

Anglers have been catching good-size rainbow trout in Fish Lake.

Lost Creek will be the primary draw for trout anglers in the Rogue watershed now through early spring.

Expo Pond, Reinhardt Pond, Lake Selma, Powers Pond and Upper Empire Lake were all posted with trout the week of Oct. 15. With the cooling weather trend, fishing should be good at these easily accessible fisheries.

Garrison Lake will be stocked this week.

2018 STOCKING SCHEDULE and STOCKING MAP

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

While getting a fishing report last Saturday from Cathy Reiss of Ringo’s Lakeside Marina, a young man targeting yellow perch off their dock hooked and landed a chunky three pound largemouth on his panfish gear.

That same Saturday, the Tenmile Bass Club had a club tournament in which 14 boats participated and the results were surprising for a November tournament. Ten of the 14 boats weighed in five bass limits and seven of the boats weighed in catches of at least ten pounds.

As I am writing this on Sunday, a few coho salmon have been reported in Tenmile Lakes and there have been no reports this week of crappie, bluegill or bullhead catfish catches. Trout fishing remains slow, but the yellow perch and largemouth bass fishing has been very good.

Coho salmon are in Siltcoos and Tahkenitch lakes, which have small dams on their outlets allowing some control over when their outlets need additional flows or a good flushing.

Tahkenitch Lake has been fishing surprisingly well for coho salmon.

As of last weekend, chinook salmon have entered the Elk and Sixes rivers and more rain is needed to get these fisheries going.

Butterfield Lake, Saunders Lake, Upper Empire Lake, Bradley Lake and Powers Pond all seem to have fair numbers of trophy rainbows left from their October trout plants.

SW Washington – Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Grays River – 18 bank anglers released 5 coho. 1 boat/3 rods had no catch.

Skamokawa Creek – No anglers sampled.

Elochoman River – 3 bank anglers had no catch.

Abernathy Creek – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Mill Creek – No anglers sampled.

Germany Creek – 1 bank angler had no catch.

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 22 bank rods had no catch. 2 boats/4 rods released 1 chinook. Above the I-5 Br: 53 bank rods kept 4 coho jacks and released 10 chinook, 4 coho jacks, 1 steelhead and 3 cutthroat. 8 boats/21 rods kept 1 coho and 18 coho jacks. Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 935 coho adults, 2,717 coho jacks, 110 fall Chinook adults, 32 fall Chinook jacks, 73 cutthroat trout and 11 summer-run steelhead adults during seven days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator. During the past week, Tacoma Power released 181 coho adults and 428 coho jacks into the Cispus River near Randle and they released 77 coho adults and 214 coho jacks at the Franklin Bridge release site in Packwood. Tacoma Power released 242 coho adults, 1,212 coho jacks, 33 fall Chinook adults, 22 fall Chinook jacks and six cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton, and they released 227 coho adults and 879 coho jacks into Lake Scanewa in Randle. River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,540 cubic feet per second on Monday, Oct. 29. Water visibility is 11 feet and the water temperature is 54.14 degrees F. River flows could change at any time so boaters and anglers should remain alert for this possibility

Kalama River – 57 bank anglers kept 2 chinook, 1 chinook jack, 1 coho, 1 steelhead and released 1 chinook, 1 coho and 1 steelhead.

Lewis River – 86 bank rods kept 6 coho, 2 coho jacks and released 2 coho and 2 coho jacks. 15 boats/37 rods kept 1 chinook jack, 7 coho and 4 coho jacks.

East Fork Lewis River – 2 bank anglers had no catch.

Salmon Creek – 6 bank anglers had no catch.

Wind River – No anglers sampled.

Klickitat River – 46 bank anglers kept 2 chinook, 16 coho, 4 coho jacks and released 4 chinook.

Fishing Rule Changes:  Grays River: effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream to the mouth of the South Fork: release all Coho. 

West Fork Grays River: effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream: release all Coho. 

Cowlitz River: Until further notice closed for Chinook retention from the mouth to the Barrier Dam including all lower Cowlitz tributaries, except the Toutle River. Until further notice, the closed waters section below the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery Barrier Dam is 400’, at the posted markers. 

Washougal River, including Camas Slough: Until further notice closed for Chinook retention from the mouth to the bridge at Salmon Falls. 

Toutle River: effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream to the forks: release all Chinook. 

North Fork Toutle River: effective October 6, 2018 until further notice, from the mouth upstream to the posted markers below the fish collection facility: release all Chinook. 

Wind River: from the mouth to 400’ below Shepherd Falls, closed for steelhead retention and closed to night fishing for salmon and steelhead. 

Drano Lake: Effective Oct. 17, 2018 until further notice. Closed to all fishing in the waters downstream of markers on a point of land downstream and across from Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery and upstream of the Highway 14 Bridge. 

White Salmon River: from the mouth to the county road bridge below the former location of the powerhouse, closed for steelhead retention and closed to night fishing for salmon and steelhead

STURGEON From the mouth of the Columbia River upstream to McNary Dam including adjacent tributaries – Until further notice, white sturgeon open for catch and release fishing only. Fishing for sturgeon at night is closed.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for November 2

Willamette Valley/Metro – With fall fisheries winding down, anglers await their next best metro opportunity, not likely to come until closer to the New Year. Winter steelhead are still months away, but as salmon options fade into November, it’s forefront on the minds of many.

Some are speculating, even in the face of a disappointing fall Chinook return, that the winter run of steelhead may be improved from previous years. Juvenile steelhead often rear on the high seas, and may have not fallen victim to the warm water blob that clearly impacted shore-running Chinook juveniles in 2014 and 2015 (returning as adults this year and next). Coho jack counts are rather impressive indicating a return to favorable ocean conditions in 2017, let’s hope that spells relief from the drop in productivity we’re currently facing full-frontal right now.

Coho counts over Willamette Falls continue to drop off, but a river rise is in the forecast that may spur additional passage. Anglers upstream of Willamette Falls still have the possibility of intercepting coho in the any coho season that happens at the mouths of the Tualatin, Molalla and Santiam Rivers this time of year. Casting spinners or drifting bobbers and eggs or jigs may produce surprising results. River rises in the upper basin will allow these fish into the respective home rivers, and make targeting them more difficult once consistent weather fronts push through.

The Clackamas and Sandy Rivers saw spikes in river levels this week, and likely the last remaining hatchery fish headed for Eagle Creek National Fish Hatchery and Cedar Creek state fish hatchery near Sandy. Some fresh hatchery fish were available, but with a depressed return, catches were far from robust. Both systems should continue to see wild coho returning to them into early December, but few anglers participate in the catch and release fisheries. Pro guide Jeff Stoeger (503-704-7920) reports, “This week we saw the Sandy take a nice jump do to the rains over the last few days. The river came up just over a foot and topped off at 8.9ft and has started to drop and is currently at 8.25ft. Hood received about 11 inches of snow and looks like it will melt with the next batch of rain and should raise the river another foot. This last rain had pushed the fish up river and the Sandy hatchery has almost fifteen hundred. The coho numbers jumped as well as summer steelhead. The hatchery has taken about half of all the fish and has given them to local food banks. The fish that are returning are half dark and other fish in nice condition. The hatchery wants to make sure that everyone knows that retention of coho salmon and steelhead are 3 fish bag limit in combination. You can fish for coho salmon all year long as long as the fish continues to return in the river.

The Portland Harbor continues to produce good catches of sturgeon for the few participating in this catch and release fishery. Fresh sand shrimp and smelt will be the key to success. Anglers fishing upstream to Willamette Falls are catching fish, but boaters downstream of the Fremont Bridge are doing the best.

Northwest Oregon – Managers for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife were forced to take drastic measures beginning today, closing most rivers on the north coast to fall Chinook fishing. The closure will affect large swaths of once-productive rivers like the Wilson, Trask and Nestucca systems as adult returns are concerning to all in the angling community.

Tillamook Bay as well as other north coast estuaries will remain open for Chinook, with a 1 fish per day/3 per season (through December 31st) bag limit to keep the harvest in check. If anglers have already harvested their 10 fish limit for the year, you’re done, period.

Ocean crabbing closed on October 15th, but remains open and productive in Tillamook Bay and the lower Columbia River. The ocean salmon season, as well as halibut close after October 31st. Rockfishing remains a viable option when seas calm, whenever that may be.

Central and Eastern Oregon – From our friend Tim Moran 

Deschutes River – Steelhead are dispersed throughout the river but not in great numbers. Most are getting hooked by trout fishermen nymphing. Trout fishing continues to be good with caddis,

Metolius River – Fall is a great time to fish the Met. Most of the crowd is gone and the colors are spectacular. There is always some surface activity in the late morning to early afternoon on small BWO’s, PMD’s, October Caddis or midge hatch.

John Day River – The water is cool now and the fish are heading toward their winter pattern. Fish deep and slow to get strikes.

Crooked River – Flows are low 60 CFS which means fish tend to stack up. there has been good dry fly fishing almost all day on BWO, PMD and caddis patterns. Small nymphs under a small indicator or on a dry/ dropper always produce here too.

Crane Prairie – This is my better late than never report – put it on your calendar for next year…Crane Prairie was off the hook last week!

From ODF&W

Anglers are catching summer steelhead on the Grande Ronde and fishing should continue to improve through October.

This time of year, trout on the Wallowa River are keying in on October caddis. Look for some good dry fly action in the afternoon.

On the John Day River, flows have increased and steelhead are starting to enter the river.

Hunter, Luger and Taylor Green ponds and Kinney Lake have been stocked this fall and fishing should be good throughout the season.

Fall can be a great time to hit some of central’s Oregon’s premier trout rivers, like the Deschutes, Crooked, Fall and Metolius.

Anglers are still catching steelhead on the lower Deschutes in the Maupin area.

Pinehollow Reservoir, Prineville Youth Fishing Pond and Taylor lake are scheduled to be stocked the week of Oct. 29.

Southwest – From ODF&W 

Trout fishing in Hemlock Lake and Lake in the Woods can be great this time of year.

Steelhead anglers should consider the middle and upper Rogue, where summer steelhead fishing continues to be good.

Anglers have been catching good-size rainbow trout in Fish Lake.

Lost Creek will be the primary draw for trout anglers in the Rogue watershed now through early spring.

Expo Pond, Reinhardt Pond, Lake Selma, Powers Pond and Upper Empire Lake were all posted with trout the week of Oct. 15. With the cooling weather trend, fishing should be good at these easily accessible fisheries.

Garrison Lake will be stocked this week.

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

Ocean fishing for chinook salmon will close on October 31st (Wednesday evening) – at which time there will be no ocean salmon fishing or crabbing. Ocean crabbing is slated to reopen on December 1st – but the reopening of the commercial crab fishery on that date is not a certainty. The commercial fleet sometimes delays starting their season when the meat content of tested crabs is below an acceptable level.

The reopening of recreational ocean crabbing in parts of northern California was delayed from it’s scheduled November 3rd start because of elevated toxin levels.

Offshore bottomfishing continues to be very good and jetty anglers are having fair to good success for lingcod, rockfish and greenling.

It appears that very few, if any, coho salmon have yet been caught in Siltcoos, Tahkenitch or Tenmile lakes – even though the season has been open since October 1st – perhaps this is a case where fishing regulations could become confusing.

A few Chinook salmon have been reported from the lower Elk River, but none reported yet taken from the Sixes River or Floras Creek.

Most streams in the state close to fishing an hour after sunset on Wednesday, October 31st. To be safe, check the fishing regulations – since there are numerous exceptions.

The Coos County lakes that were recently planted with large rainbow trout have been fishing well – with the possible exception of Butterfield Lake where fly anglers have had to deal with large numbers of pesky juvenile steelhead.

The crappies and bluegills in Eel Lake seemed to have quit biting, but most likely have moved to deeper water and have not yet been “rediscovered” by anglers.

Now that the ODFW has started putting the landlocked coho into Cooper Creek Reservoir that they used to plant in Galesville Reservoir, Cooper Creek’s cold weather fishing should be much more interesting as the cohos should definitely be more active in cool water than the reservoir’s other fish species.

The Umpqua and Coquille rivers are still relatively clear and producing smallmouth bass with the best fishing occurring in the afternoons.

SW Washington – Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 51 bank rods kept 15 coho jacks and released 1 chinook jack. 11 boats/23 rods kept 4 coho, 3 coho jacks and released 1 chinook, 1 coho and 1 coho jack. Above the I-5 Br: 82 bank rods kept 1 coho jack, 3 steelhead and released 40 chinook, 1 chinook jack, 1 coho and 2 coho jacks. 9 boats/22 rods kept 1 coho, 9 coho jacks, 1 steelhead and released 1 chinook and 10 coho jacks. Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 935 coho adults, 2,717 coho jacks, 110 fall Chinook adults, 32 fall Chinook jacks, 73 cutthroat trout and 11 summer-run steelhead adults during seven days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator. During the past week, Tacoma Power released 181 coho adults and 428 coho jacks into the Cispus River near Randle and they released 77 coho adults and 214 coho jacks at the Franklin Bridge release site in Packwood. Tacoma Power released 242 coho adults, 1,212 coho jacks, 33 fall Chinook adults, 22 fall Chinook jacks and six cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton, and they released 227 coho adults and 879 coho jacks into Lake Scanewa in Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,540 cubic feet per second on Monday, Oct. 29. Water visibility is 11 feet and the water temperature is 54.14 degrees F. River flows could change at any time so boaters and anglers should remain alert for this possibility

Kalama River – 9 bank anglers kept 1 coho, 1 steelhead and released 1 chinook and 8 coho.

Lewis River – 109 bank anglers kept 1 chinook, 2 coho, 2 coho jacks and released 2 chinook, 1 chinook jack, 2 coho and 2 coho jacks. 10 boats/24 rods kept 3 chinook jacks, 3 coho, 3 coho jacks and released 3 chinook.

Klickitat River – 38 bank anglers kept 1 chinook, 1 chinook jack, 1 coho jack and released 2 chinook and 1 chinook jack.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for October 27

Willamette Valley/Metro – Chinook passage at Bonneville Dam is but a trickle right now, a sign that the run is on its last legs and clearly under-performed fishery manager’s expectations. Chinook jack counts don’t point to an improvement for the 2019 return, but if there’s any one lesson we’ve all learned in recent years, predictions are unreliable. Jack coho counts on the other hand have out-paced the 10-year average, pointing to a rebound in returns for 2019. Steelhead returns often mimic coho returns so maybe we’ve seen the bottom of the barrel for the 2-salt species.

Anglers are still putting forth effort on the Sandy and Clackamas Rivers for coho, even in the extremely low flows we’re currently experiencing. Success rates are low under these conditions however, coho are notoriously lock-jawed salmon, especially in low, clear flows. Eagle Creek hatchery has some fish in its holding raceway, but more are expected from the mainstem Clackamas if flows jump as expected. It won’t take much in the way of a river rise to inspire returning adults to these hatchery facilities, hopefully this week’s precipitation triggers it. Pro guide Jeff Stoeger (503) 704-7920 of O2BFISHN Guide Service reports, “The Sandy on Tuesday started to color up for there was a heat inversion and it had started to melt some of the upper glaciers. The river has dropped again to 7.66ft and should go up over the next couple of days. The weather forecast shows that we should get about 3/4 inch of rain over the next five or six days. There is fish in the river from Cedar Creek all the way down to Troutdale. There is pods of fish stacking up and will move with the next rains.

Coho on Cedar Creek on the Sandy system are also staging at the creek’s mouth, waiting for the next rain freshet that will give them access to their home hatchery. Effort can be intense at these pinch points as late October is commonly when fish are at full capacity at these hatchery facilities. Bobber and bait is producing some biters at daybreak, but fish become timid soon after sunrise. You can see more of Jeff’s report and an upcoming forecast for the Sandy River by becoming a paid subscriber HERE. Paid subscribers get about FIVE TIMES the amount of information for fifty cents a week!

Sturgeon fishing remains excellent in the Portland Harbor and should remain productive well into the fall. Smelt and sand shrimp should produce the best results in the deeper holes downstream of the Fremont Bridge.

The Association of Northwest Steelheaders is holding its 31st annual Hall of Fame Banquet in Wilsonville on November 10th. Great raffle prizes and auction items will be up for bid with proceeds going to the many programs the Steelheaders lead. Tickets are available at www.nwsteelheaders.org.

Northwest Oregon – Chinook fishing in Tillamook remains challenging for most, but Bay City and the Ghost Hole will be primary targets for trollers this week with the stronger tides pushing in. Seaweed may also be a factor once again as stronger tides and a storm surge tend to bring in the fouling foliage.

Tidewater of the Wilson River is rumored to have fair numbers of Chinook available. Tides improve for bobber fishers, but do check the ODF&W web site for current regulations as there is talk of a limited closure to protect concentrated Chinook in the tidewater reaches of some coastal systems. Returns already look compromised and tidewater fish seem particularly vulnerable when they can’t access the upper reaches of these systems.

The ocean swell is forecasted to be on the increase as is commonly the case this time of year. The ocean salmon season as well as halibut season closes on October 31st. Many charter operations are also closing for the winter although bottomfishing should remain productive.

Bay crabbing will be challenging this weekend with the bump in tide exchange. Astoria even more so given the large drainage the Columbia drains.

Central and Eastern Oregon – From ODF&W

Anglers are catching summer steelhead on the Grande Ronde and fishing should continue to improve through October.

This time of year, trout on the Wallowa River are keying in on October caddis. Look for some good dry fly action in the afternoon.

On the John Day River, flows have increased and steelhead are starting to enter the river.

Hunter, Luger and Taylor Green ponds and Kinney Lake have been stocked this fall and fishing should be good throughout the season.

Bikini Pond, Taylor Lake and the Prineville Youth Fishing Pond have been stocked with legal and extra trophy trout, and fishing should be good.

On the lower Deschutes, steelhead are passing over Sherars Falls and fishing should be fair in the Maupin area.

Anglers have been catching fall Chinook at Sherars Falls on the Deschutes, and can expect good numbers of fish through October.

The Fall River was stocked recently and anglers report good fishing throughout the river.

More on our site will be available on Friday.

Southwest – From ODF&W 

Several waterbodies in the Coos Bay were stocked with one-pound trout last week – giving anglers one last chance before winter hits. Upper Empire, Butterfield, Saunders, Bradley lakes and Powers Pond all have been stocked.

If you’re in the mood for a fish fry, yellow perch fishing has been excellent in Tenmile Lakes.

Anglers are catching hatchery coho in the lower Rogue, and there are reports of coho in the Grants Pass area.

Fishing for summer steelhead in the middle and upper Rogue should be good for the next month or two due to a strong run this year.

Trout fishing has been very good in Applegate and Lost Creek reservoirs.

Expo Pond in Central Point, and Reinhardt Pond in Grants Pass both received Rainbow Trout this past weekend. With the cooling weather trend, fishing should be good at these easily accessible fisheries.

Bottomfish anglers may now fish at all depths for the remainder of the year. The daily bag limit for marine fish is 5 plus 2 lingcod. The retention of cabezon is now closed for the remainder of the year.

Anglers may also choose to fish the offshore longleader fishery outside of the 40-fathom regulatory line which is open year round. The longleader fishery has a daily bag limit of 10 fish made of yellowtail, widow, canary, redstripe, greenstripe, silvergray, and bocaccio rockfish. No other groundfish are allowed and offshore longleader fishing trips cannot be combined with traditional bottomfish, flatfish or halibut trips. Find information about a longleader setup here.

Salmon fishing is open through Oct. 31 from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mountain with a limit of two salmon per day. But salmon anglers are limited to fishing inside the 40 fathom line. The Elk River Fall Chinook State Waters Terminal Season starts on Nov. 1-30.

From Humbug Mountain to the OR/CA border, salmon fishing is closed for the season.

The Nearshore halibut season is open seven days a week through the earlier of the attaining the quota or Oct. 31. As of Oct. 14 there is 33 percent of the quota remaining.

For the southern Oregon Subarea, halibut is open 7 days a week through Oct. 31 or attaining the quota of 8,982 lbs. As of Oct. 14 there is 33 percent of the quota remaining.

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

Regarding ocean recreation – crabbing is now closed and will remain so until December 1st when both sport and commercial crabbing in the ocean will resume. Of course there is always the chance of a toxin-related closure or a voluntary closure by the commercial crabbing fleet because of a low meat content in the crabs they test.

River and bay crabbing appears to be slowing down, but is still decent for boat crabbers.

The ocean chinook fishery will close an hour after sunset on October 31st).

Steve Godin took some OCA memberson his boat to fish the Chetco River’s “bubble fishery” in early October and one member, Russell Smitherman, was fortunate enough to hook and land a 40 pound chinook. Steve said that since the “fishing area” only extends to three miles offshore, the 250 boats Steve was competing with made for very crowded fishing conditions.

The best ocean angling opportunities are for bottomfish. The long leader method is still legal in waters deeper than 240 feet – but most anglers are using conventional bottomfish methods.

Coho salmon fisheries on Tahkenitch, Tenmile and Siltcoos lakes has been open since October 1st, but no salmon have yet been reported in Tahkenitch and Tenmile lakes.

Bradley Lake is slated to receive 800 trophy rainbows this week in addition to the 800 it received last week and should offer good trout fishing.
Trout fishing should also be good on Upper Empire Lake which currently has less than 30 acres of water and received more than 3,200 trophy rainbows last week.

SW Washington – From WDF&W:

from October 15th:

Salmon/Steelhead:

Columbia River Tributaries

Elochoman River – No anglers sampled. Cowlitz River – I-5 Br downstream: 59 bank rods kept 9 coho jacks and released 11 coho jacks. 26 boats/57 rods kept 8 coho, 12 coho jacks and released 2 chinook, 3 chinook jacks, 4 coho and 2 coho jacks. Above the I-5 Br: 68 bank rods kept 1 coho, 3 coho jacks, 5 steelhead and released 36 chinook, 1 chinook jack and 2 coho jacks. 8 boats/18 rods kept 3 coho, 12 coho jacks, 1 steelhead and released 2 chinook.

Last week, Tacoma Power employees recovered 1,225 coho adults, 2,584 coho jacks, 256 fall Chinook adults, 49 fall Chinook jacks, 210 cutthroat trout and 49 summer-run steelhead adults during seven days of operations at the Cowlitz Salmon Hatchery separator. During the past week, Tacoma Power released 92 coho adults and 197 coho jacks into the Cispus River near Randle, and they released 101 coho adults and 232 coho jacks at the Franklin Bridge release site in Packwood. Tacoma Power released 300 coho adults, 1,176 coho jacks, 38 fall Chinook adults, 17 fall Chinook jacks and 15 cutthroat trout into the Tilton River at Gust Backstrom Park in Morton, and they released 467 coho adults, 890 coho jacks and three cutthroat trout into Lake Scanewa in Randle.

River flows at Mayfield Dam are approximately 3,560 cubic feet per second on Monday, Oct. 15. Water visibility is 14 feet and the water temperature is 53.2 degrees F. River flows could change at any time so boaters and anglers should remain alert for this possibility.

Kalama River – 28 bank anglers kept 1 steelhead. 2 boats/2 rods released 1 steelhead.

Lewis River – 105 bank anglers kept 1 chinook jack, 7 coho, 5 coho jacks and released 2 chinook, 2 chinook jacks, 2 coho, 3 coho jacks and 2 steelhead. 22 boats/55 rods kept 1 chinook, 3 chinook jacks, 3 coho, 20 coho jacks and released 1 chinook, 3 chinook jacks, 2 coho jacks and 1 steelhead.

Wind River – No anglers sampled.

Drano Lake – 3 bank anglers kept 1 chinook. 36 boats/84 rods kept 33 chinook, 35 chinook jacks, 2 coho, 2 coho jacks and released 24 chinook, 11 chinook jacks and 1 coho.

Klickitat River – 80 bank anglers kept 43 chinook and 12 chinook jacks, 3 coho and released 2 chinook and 1 coho jack.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for October 19

Willamette Valley/Metro – With so few options for salmon in the Portland/Metro area, anglers are looking to the coast for a fall chance at chrome, with most effort falling on Tillamook and Nehalem Bays. Passage at Bonneville remains depressed, that will surely have consequences for next year.

The Sandy and Clackamas remain options for coho anglers but adults are hunkered down in deep holes and not very receptive to angler’s offerings. Early morning spinner and jig casters are catching a few fish, but after sunrise, it gets even more challenging. Pro guide Jeff Stoeger (503) 704-7920 of O2BFISHN Guide Service reports, “This week, we saw the river go up and then it dropped below 7.6 ft. There is still fish spread throughout the entire  river with best action taking place in midriver and you can find the fish in mid to deep pools.  The hatchery has between 150 to 200 coho so far and are expected to get more with the next substantial rain fall starting next week.”

Coho counts over Willamette Falls is fair, and fish are providing nominal fishing opportunity at the mouths of many of the upper tributaries including the Tualatin, Yamhill, Molalla, and Santiam Rivers. Spinners and bobber and eggs are a good choice for innovative anglers.

Canby Pond and the Mt. Hood Community College Pond will each be stocked with hundreds of rainbow trout this week, and should be easy pickings for anglers turning out in the nice weather. Henry Hagg Lake near Forest Grove is also a great fall trout option for both boat and bank anglers.

The Portland Harbor has fair to good sturgeon fishing this time of year, but no catch and keep season is likely in the foreseeable future.

Northwest Oregon – Fall Chinook continue to be elusive on Tillamook Bay, but it remains the favored fishery on the entire north coast. Chinook in the high 20-pound range are caught every day, with the Ghost Hole, Bay City and during last week’s low tide exchange, the jaws along the north jetty produced fair catches near low tide.

Pro-Troll flashers with Fatal Flash spinners in size 3.0 and 5, especially in chartreuse and red/white have been the go-to colors. Seaweed remains a hindrance and with another strong tide series this weekend, success will be challenging.

You can see more of Bob’s report and an upcoming forecast for the entire north coast by becoming a paid subscriber HERE. Paid subscribers get about FIVE TIMES the amount of information for fifty cents a week!

Coho are still making up a fair percentage of the catch and must be released unharmed. Hatchery coho are in the Trask and North Fork Nehalem, albeit in low numbers and are past their prime.

Anglers have been taking advantage of calm seas and chamber of commerce weather on the ocean. The deep reef fishery continues to yield large lingcod and canary rockfish, along with other species as well. Weekend weather looks like it will hold for this unique fishery.

Ocean crabbing closed on October 15th, and won’t open again until December 1st. Overall the season wasn’t as productive as it usually is, but quality keepers were had throughout the fall months. Bay crabbing is competitive, but should also produce fair catches until the first significant fall rains hit.

Despite optimum weather conditions, motivated albacore anglers are hard to find. The recent grade of albacore have been running quite small. So small in fact that local canneries aren’t taking commercial catches as of late. Many offshore anglers have hung it up for the season, at least for tuna.

Astoria area – Despite big tide exchanges, crabbing has been good on the lower Columbia River Afternoon tides this weekend should yield good results too.

Southwest – From ODF&W

Several waterbodies in the Coos Bay will be stocked with one-pound trout this week – giving anglers one last chance before winter hits. Upper Empire, Butterfield, Saunders, Bradley lakes and Powers Pond all will be stocked.

If you’re in the mood for a fish fry, yellow perch fishing has been excellent in Tenmile Lakes.

Anglers are catching hatchery coho in the lower Rogue, and there are reports of coho in the Grants Pass area.

Fishing for summer steelhead in the middle and upper Rogue should be good for the next month or two due to a strong run this year.

Trout fishing has been very good in Applegate and Lost Creek reservoirs.

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

It appears that there is no chance of duplicating the 59 pound Chinook salmon that was caught in Hunter Creek over Thanksgiving Weekend several years ago because Beginning October 15 through December 31, 2018 the stream is closed to fishing for Chinook salmon.

While salmon fishing is tough for everything except wild coho, which are unkeepable, some Chinooks and fin-clipped cohos are still being caught.

Jetty anglers are doing fair to good for lingcod, striped surfperch, greenling and rockfish. Boat anglers fishing in waters beyond 180 feet are getting limits of lingcod and rockfish.

As of October 15th, recreational ocean crabbing is closed. Both commercial ocean crabbing, which closed on August 15th, and recreational crabbing will reopen on December 1st – although commercial crabbers may voluntarily delay their season opener if tested crabs lack sufficient meat content.

Planted trout are, once again, on the menu. Several Coos County waters are slated to receive trout plants this week. They are: Bradley Lake (800 15-inch rainbows); Butterfield Lake (1,390 15-inch rainbows); Upper Empire Lake (3,210 15-inch rainbows); Powers Pond (1,300 15-inch rainbows) and Saunders Lake (1,300 15-inch rainbows).

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for October 13

Willamette Valley/Metro – With little to fish for in the Portland area, anglers are hinging their bets on a brighter future for salmon. Dam passage at Bonneville remains uninspiring, but jack coho counts are tracking above the 10-year average, indicating a much better year, next year. Chinook jack counts may indicate another down year for Chinook in 2019. Much of the blame rests with what scientists term “The Warm Water Blob,” an anomaly never before observed, at least in this magnitude, in the Pacific Ocean. It appears the blob has receded, hopefully bringing back some normalcy to future returns of salmon. Steelhead have suffered too, as the river-wide closure for all salmon and steelhead remains in effect.

Catch and release sturgeon fishing in the lower Willamette remains a fair option.

Anglers working the Clackamas River are finding an occasional coho downstream of Eagle Creek. Recent precipitation has improved catches, but action is far from consistent. Spinners and casted jigs will likely continue to produce the best results as we enter peak season for this fishery.

Sandy River anglers are finding some hatchery coho downstream of Cedar Creek. Fish are beginning to congregate in higher numbers at the popular creek mouth, awaiting a better flush of rain to bring them up to the hatchery. Early mornings are best, fish become timid after the morning bite. Pro guide Jeff Stoeger (503) 704-7920 of O2BFISHN Guide Service reports, “The river finally took its first good jump with the latest rain. We had a few showers and the river barely bumped in height. This last week rain showers, caused the river jumping up a foot and turned the river milk chocolate brown. The river was running at 7.56 and perfect steelhead green and low then jumped to 8.5ft  on Tuesday and has started to drop but will remain brown and off color for a few days. Before the river blew up there were reports of fish being caught in lower river and at oxbow park area. There were reports that a few bright springers were still caught in Oxbow as well as some coho.”

You can see more of Jeff’s report and an upcoming forecast for the Sandy, Clackamas and entire north coast by becoming a paid subscriber HERE. Paid subscribers get about FIVE TIMES the amount of information for fifty cents a week!

Canby Pond is slated for trout stocking this week, and Henry Hagg Lake should continue to be a good bet through October.

Northwest Oregon – Chinook fishing in Tillamook Bay has remained challenging as last weekend’s SHOT tournament held by the Association of Northwest Steelheaders yielded just 5 fish for 40 anglers over a 2-day period. The largest fish tipped the scales at just over 18 pounds.

The stronger tide series brought about abundant amounts of seaweed, further impeding success for the fall run fish. Wild coho seem to be as plentiful as Chinook this season, but must be released unharmed. The Ghost Hole, Bay City and the Coast Guard Station in front of Garibaldi are producing the most consistent success, at high tide when the seaweed and eelgrass are less of a problem.

Mid-October produced some of the season’s best catches last year, anglers are holding out hope. Chinook jacks are more prevalent in this year’s catches too, hopefully indicating a stronger return of 4-year olds next year.

Tidewater bobber fishers remain perplexed with the lack of fish lately, but the Wilson, Trask and Tillamook tidewater reaches should all have some fish available.

The ocean swell may be subsiding over the weekend. Bottomfishers are anxious as the deep-reef fishery produced some monster lingcod prior to the current rough ocean conditions. Large canary and yellow tail rockfish hit the decks as well.

Other north coast estuaries are under-performing as well, including the Nehalem. The North Fork hatchery did report some dark coho being taken on eggs over the weekend however.

Astoria area – Despite big tide exchanges, crabbing has been good on the lower Columbia River Afternoon tides this weekend should yield good results too.

Southwest – From ODF&W

The wild coho fishery opened on Tenmile Lakes on Oct. 1, though it will take a few good rains to chase the fish into lake.

The Chetco bubble fishery will be open this weekend, Oct. 13-14.

Anglers are catching hatchery coho in the lower Rogue, and there are reports of coho in the Grants Pass area.

Fishing for summer steelhead in the middle ane upper Rogue should be good for the next month or two due to a strong run this year.

Both boat ramps at Lost Creek Reservoir are usable at this time, and large trout were stocked there last week. Trout fishing should be very good at Lost Creek through the winter and early spring.

Bottomfish anglers may now fish at all depths for the remainder of the year. The daily bag limit for marine fish is 5 plus 2 lingcod. The retention of cabezon is now closed for the remainder of the year.

Anglers may also choose to fish the offshore longleader fishery outside of the 40-fathom regulatory line which is open year round. The longleader fishery has a daily bag limit of 10 fish made of yellowtail, widow, canary, redstripe, greenstripe, silvergray, and bocaccio rockfish. No other groundfish are allowed and offshore longleader fishing trips cannot be combined with traditional bottomfish, flatfish or halibut trips.

Salmon fishing is open through Oct. 31 from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mountain with a limit of two salmon per day. But salmon anglers are limited to fishing inside the 40 fathom line.

From Humbug Mountain to the OR/CA border, salmon fishing closed on Aug. 26. The Chetco River Fall Chinook State Waters Terminal Fishery will open on Oct. 13-14 with a daily bag limit of 1 Chinook per angler.

The Nearshore halibut season is open seven days a week and as of Sept. 30 there is 34 percent of the quota remaining. The remaining 7,968 lbs of the All-depth quota was moved to the nearshore halibut quota on Sept. 6.

For the southern Oregon Subarea, halibut is open 7 days a week through Oct. 31 or attaining the quota of 8,982 lbs. As of Sept. 30 there is 40 percent of the quota remaining.

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

Salmon fishing remains fair on the lower Umpqua River at Winchester Bay. But few chinooks or finclipped cohos are being caught. Bank anglers seem to be doing every bit as good as the boat anglers.

The coho salmon seasons on Siltcoos. Tahkenitch and Tenmile lakes opened on October 1st and second rod validations immediately became invalid on those three lakes. No salmon have been reported yet in all three lakes, but a series of high tides could get salmon into the Siltcoos River, but there may not be enough water flowing through the fish ladder at the dam for the salmon to actually use it and move upstream past Highway 101 where they become legal to fish for. Very seldom do Tahkenitch and Tenmile lakes get any coho salmon before the end of October. The lower deadline on Tahkenitch Lake is the Highway 101 Bridge. The lower deadline on Tenmile Lakes is the bridge on Hilltop Drive in Lakeside.

It most likely will not be a productive coho season on these lakes, but at least anglers can keep wild or unclipped coho salmon. The daily limit is one adult and one jack salmon per day and the season limit, which includes all three lakes, is five adult salmon. Anglers are supposed to quit salmon fishing after keeping an adult coho salmon.

The Chetco bubble fishery opens for the first of two weekends on Oct. 6-7.

Striped bass angling on the Smith and Coquille rivers should remain poor to fair through October when it typically slows to a crawl.

Afternoon fishing for smallmouth bass should be fair to good, but slower in numbers than during the summer, but the chances of bass longer than 15-inches will be improved.

Afternoon fishing for largemouth bass should be productive on most area lakes.

Ocean crabbing remains good, but the recreational season will close on October 15th. River and bay crabbing will remain open all year – subject to emergency closures for elevated toxin levels.

Bottomfishishing in marine waters deeper than 180 feet, using convential angling methods, reopened on October 1st and fishing has been very good. Long leader bottomfishing is still legal in waters deeper than 240 feet, but almost every marine angler is opting for the conventional techniques – which allows them to keep two lingcod (22-inch minimum) and five bottomfish. Cabezon are still illegal to keep.

There is always more Oregon fishing information delivered earlier on our site, The Guide’s Forecast.  You can also sign-up for our weekly emails here.

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Oregon Fishing Reports for October 6

Willamette Valley/Metro – Chinook numbers remain depressed at Bonneville Dam and anglers will remain sidelined for the foreseeable future. The mainstem Columbia is closed to almost all fishing, catch and release sturgeon remains one of the few options.

Coho are entering the Sandy and Clackamas River systems in better numbers now, but until significant precipitation comes, they will be challenging to catch. The lower reaches of each of these systems is holding the best numbers now, but fish are slowly making their way to upstream pools. Cloudy skies are helping increase success rates, but anglers are anxiously awaiting the first fall rains. Pro guide Jeff Stoeger (503) 704-7920 of O2BFISHN Guide Service reports, “This week, the Sandy was up and down for catching coho and steelhead. The upper river has been slow  as well as the lower river. The forecast is for rain on Friday into Saturday and they are predicting up to a half inch of rain that should get the fish at the mouth to move up river. The hope is that the river will go up a couple of inches and cause the fish to move into the main sections of the river.” The Clackamas has coho spread throughout reports manager Robert Campbell from Fishermen’s Marine and Outdoor in Oregon City. Robert stated spinner casters working Clackamette Park (at the mouth) are taking fish daily both in the morning and late evenings. Boats flatlining plugs in the Willamette around the mouth of the river are also taking some coho.

You can see more of Jeff’s report and an upcoming forecast for the Sandy, Clackamas and entire north coast by becoming a paid subscriber HERE. Paid subscribers get about FIVE TIMES the amount of information for fifty cents a week!

Historically, anglers had ample opportunity for salmon, steelhead and sturgeon in the fall. This year, anglers are sidelined on the mainstem Columbia, while the Willamette continues to put out fair catches of sturgeon for catch and release, but no salmon to speak of. Fall trout opportunities are plentiful however, and trout in the high lakes go on a feeding rampage before the cold winter months about to hit. Check the ODF&W web site for the most recent stocking schedule, but also prepare for inclement weather as it’s sure to strike with little notice this time of year.

Northwest Oregon – Salmon fishing remains challenging on most north coast estuaries. Tillamook Bay continues to put out a few Chinook to trollers working the Ghost Hole and Bay City, but other areas of the estuary and tidewater reaches are producing fair-at-best results. The south channel has an occasional Chinook, but the bubble fishery in the ocean waters adjacent to Tillamook Bay is producing poorly. The jaws of Tillamook Bay have also been yielding some salmon, mostly wild coho however, but an occasional Chinook too.

Wild coho are present in most estuaries and some are so large, they are easily mistaken for Chinook salmon. Anglers should be 100% sure of the species they retain, several wild coho have been confiscated at the dock, with hefty fines doled out as a consequence. Only hatchery coho may be retained in bays and rivers, but few seem available to anglers this year. As of Monday, the North Fork Nehalem has yet to receive any coho back to the hatchery.

Bottomfishing remains a good option out of Garibaldi. October 1st marked the opening of the deep reef fishery, where large lingcod and ample numbers of large rockfish make for easy limits on most days. Calm seas early in the week yielded good catches, this is an opportunity that’s not likely to last long as ocean conditions will certainly deteriorate before long. Nearshore bottomfishing remains good too, but an increase in the bag limit to 5 rockfish (and 2 lingcod) per person. The long-leader fishery still allows for 10 fish bag limits and has been wildly popular and productive.

Ocean crabbing is still productive, but will close to recreational opportunity after October 15th. Bay crabbing should be more challenging this weekend as stronger tides keep crabs dug in.

Astoria area – Crabbing in the lower Columbia was good last weekend, but stronger tides this weekend won’t produce easy limits.

Tuna chasers did good late last week and it should remain a viable fishery for another 2 weeks if the ocean cooperates.

Southwest – From ODF&W

Diamond and Willow lakes are good bets for some fall trout fishing.

The wild coho fishery opened on Tenmile Lakes on Oct. 1, though it will take a few good rains to chase the fish into lake.

The Chetco bubble fishery opens for the first of two weekends on Oct. 6-7.

Fishing for Chinook is now closed upstream of the Hog Creek boat ramp on the Rogue (middle and upper Rogue River). Fishing for summer steelhead should be good for the next month or two due to a strong run this year. Only hatchery Summer Steelhead may be harvested.

Both boat ramps at Lost Creek Reservoir are usable at this time, and large trout are being stocked there this week. Trout fishing should be very good at Lost Creek through the winter and early spring.

Reminder that even though the fishery is now open to all-depth, the Stonewall Bank Yelloweye Rockfish Conservation area, approximately 15 miles west of Newport, is closed to bottomfish (groundfish) and halibut fishing year round.

From Pete Heley at PeteHeley.com

As of October 1st, anglers can once again fish waters deeper than 180 feet using conventional bottomfishing techniques and be able to keep lingcod, greenling and black and blue rockfish. The retention of cabezon is still not allowed due to a still-existing emergency closure.

Long leader bottomfishing in marine waters at least 240 feet deep is still legal, but lingcod, greenling and black and blue rockfish are not legal to keep – but the daily limit for the mid-depth bottomfish species legal to keep is ten fish.

Last week bank anglers had a couple of awesome days casting spinners at Half Moon Bay and Osprey Point and boat anglers did well trolling herring last week at Winchester Bay, but the “bite” was short lived and comprised overwhelmingly of unkeepable wild cohos and anglers were quickly reminded that it hasnt been a good salmon year for the entire Oregon coast – or the Washington coast too – for that matter.

The recreational ocean crabbing season is coming to a close. The last day will be October 15th and on December 1st the ocean crabbing season will reopen unless there is elevated levels of toxins.

Low river levels have led to increased salinity levels which has allowed legal-sized crabs to move upriver at least two miles on the Umpqua, Siuslaw and Coquille rivers and crabbing has been good. Crabbing in Oregon’s rivers and bays is legal all year and should remain productive until heavy rains move the crabs seaward.

Fishing for surfperch along the beaches in our area has been slow, but could pickup at any time.

Fishing for striped bass has been slow on Smith River and it seems that nobody has been fishing the Umpqua River for stripers. The Coquille River has recently been producing the best striper fishing, but success has been inconsistent with the best fishing occurring above the Highway 101 Bridge near Bandon.

Slightly cooler water temperatures have allowed for some improvement in bass and panfish angling. Unlike central and eastern Oregon, where bass and panfish angling is already in afternoon and early evening mode, the Oregon coast and western Oregon are still capable of producing decent fishing all day.

As water temperatures drop on the Umpqua, smallmouth bass catches decrease numbers-wise, but the chances of catching larger fish increase. Smallmouth bass fishing has recently improved on the Smith River and the fishery is not yet dominated by small bass as is the Umpqua.

Yellow perch usually bite well during cool weather and if you should catch a 14 or 15-inch perch, remind yourself that it could have been an Oregon state record – if you had caught it in February or March.

For those anglers that usually fish Wickiup Reservoir for trophy brown trout in the fall and are now looking for a “plan B”, both Paulina and East Lake contain trophy browns. Although Paulina holds the unofficial Oregon record (35 and 1/2 pounds) as well as the official state record (28 pounds and five ounces), East Lake currently offers much better brown trout angling.

Although the Owyhee River below Owyhee Reservoir is a very highly rated brown trout stream, the browns seem to top out at about eight or nine pounds.

Out of Depoe Bay, deep water Ling Cod fishing opened Monday. Reports that inshore fihsing had been very good over the weekend with limits on Rockfish regularly obtained. The Ling Cod catch has been spoty. Crabbing closes ont eh 16th.

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